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Protecting users from themselves

Because yesterday's security doesn’t work

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Live Now! ‘“The problem with making things foolproof is that we keep evolving a better class of fool”, as the old saying goes. And nowhere is this more true than in security where breaches remain regular and commonplace despite all the investment that has gone into it.

Part of the problem is that we expect users to be experts in security, when in reality what they want to do is be successful in their job and will hunt out ways to make this happen. If security gets in the way, there will be a workaround. New devices and services give users much more to choose from, and more problems for IT to solve.

Getting to grips with this is vital, because the increased risk is holding many businesses back from working more flexibly, getting closer to customers and having more integration with partners and supply chain. But it’s clear, we need to be thinking of the bigger picture when it comes to protecting users from themselves.

Live today (18:00 GMT and 10:00 PST), we have an audiocast with experts talking about just these issues, in the hope of getting to the heart of the problem of securing end users and protecting them from their own actions. Tim Phillips from The Register is your host and he's joined by analyst Andrew Buss from Freeform Dynamics and Chris Boyd from GFI.

The program today is taking a road through the following topics, each of which will be considered in turn and giving examples of best practice where possible:

• An overview of the situation

o The changing face of end user computing

o Emerging risks

o Impact on the business

• Why security is not working

o Rising costs and continuing breaches

o Sensitive information contained on many devices

o User behaviour

• Protecting users

o What is realistic to expect

o Can training help?

o Monitoring and enforcing policy

We’re aiming to provide lots of real world context using examples of how customers in the real world are addressing these matters. Join us today and share your experiences too, through a live Q&A, and get answers to any questions you may have.

The event is free and you can register now. ®

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