Feeds

Roundabouts and swings at Everything Everywhere

Financial wizardry shows all is lost/fine

Intelligent flash storage arrays

Everything Everywhere has lower revenues and fewer customers, though you wouldn't know it from the annual figures which show year-on-year growth of 1.5 per cent and contract numbers rising.

The details, inevitably, show that the growth is "excluding regulatory impact", while the 33 per cent increase in contract customers only appears when compared to the rate of increase during the preceding year.

Everything Everywhere did manage to sign up 100,000 more contracts during 2010, but the operator lost a million prepaid customers over the same period, and while we don't have financial figures for the whole year* the last nine months of 2010 saw turnover down to £5.3bn, dropping by more than £100m compared to 2009.

Even the company's own "Adjusted EBITDA" (earnings before interest, taxes, depreciation and amortisation, adjusted to exclude restructuring costs, brand and management fees) is down by almost £150m to £1.023bn.

It's not all bad - average revenue per user (ARPU) is up slightly, to £19.70 a month, but it's hard to see why when ARPU from contract customers is down by 30 pence (to £35.20) and prepaid customers are spending 60 pence a month less (down to £7.60). More worrying is the increasing reliance on voice revenue, which now contributes 73.8 per cent (up .3 per cent) to the total coming in.

But Everything Everywhere is still getting used to being the UK's largest mobile operator, and applying the cost savings that should be achieved by cutting back on duplication - apparently it's already saved £146m in operational spending during 2010, and remains on track to implement £3.5bn in "synergy capture".

For customers the best news is that 3G roaming, between Orange and T-Mobile networks, is coming later this year, and the 4.3 million customers who opted into 2G roaming are now being joined by the rest of the customer base. ®

* Everything Everywhere was formed during 2010.

Security for virtualized datacentres

More from The Register

next story
TEEN RAMPAGE: Kids in iPhone 6 'Will it bend' YouTube 'prank'
iPhones bent in Norwich? As if the place wasn't weird enough
Consumers agree to give up first-born child for free Wi-Fi – survey
This Herod network's ace – but crap reception in bullrushes
Crouching tiger, FAST ASLEEP dragon: Smugglers can't shift iPhone 6s
China's grey market reports 'sluggish' sales of Apple mobe
Sea-Me-We 5 construction starts
New sub cable to go live 2016
New EU digi-commish struggles with concepts of net neutrality
Oettinger all about the infrastructure – but not big on substance
EE coughs to BROKEN data usage metrics BLUNDER that short-changes customers
Carrier apologises for 'inflated' measurements cockup
Comcast: Help, help, FCC. Netflix and pals are EXTORTIONISTS
The others guys are being mean so therefore ... monopoly all good, yeah?
Surprise: if you work from home you need the Internet
Buffer-rage sends Aussies out to experience road rage
prev story

Whitepapers

A strategic approach to identity relationship management
ForgeRock commissioned Forrester to evaluate companies’ IAM practices and requirements when it comes to customer-facing scenarios versus employee-facing ones.
Storage capacity and performance optimization at Mizuno USA
Mizuno USA turn to Tegile storage technology to solve both their SAN and backup issues.
High Performance for All
While HPC is not new, it has traditionally been seen as a specialist area – is it now geared up to meet more mainstream requirements?
Beginner's guide to SSL certificates
De-mystify the technology involved and give you the information you need to make the best decision when considering your online security options.
Security for virtualized datacentres
Legacy security solutions are inefficient due to the architectural differences between physical and virtual environments.