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Panasonic brings Skype to Blu-ray boxes

Sensible call?

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Panasonic has introduced Skype to its range of 3D Blu-ray players, so those without the video-conference tool built into their TV set can still utilise the service on the big screen.

The tool also allows users to set up voicemail, which the company demonstrated at its annual dealer convention this week with some cheesy examples of pre-recorded answerphone messages.

Panasonic BD310

Panasonic's 3D Blu-ray range can be controlled through a new iPhone app too, a feature Sony was first to implement last year. With Panasonic's controls though, as well as having a tidy UI, a simple shake of the phone will open and close the disk tray.

The company has also imbedded sensors in a couple of models that control the disc tray simply through a close proximity hand wave. Who needs buttons in this day and age, eh?

All models now feature DLNA compatibility and broader format support, as well as lower energy consumption. The company has even reduced its box sizes in a bid to cut down the carbon footprint. All models will be available in the coming months, although there's no word on pricing just yet. ®

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