Feeds

Gov will pay £2.25m compo to ID card suppliers

Money down drain says Blunkett ... who should know

Securing Web Applications Made Simple and Scalable

The cost of compensating suppliers after the scrapping of the ID card scheme is likely to hit £2.25m, Home Office Damian Green has confirmed.

Green disclosed the figure in a letter to former Labour Home Secretary and erstwhile ID card enthusiast David Blunkett, the Daily Telegraph reports.

On top of the payments of £2.25m to suppliers who saw the whole ID edifice come crashing down, scrapping the system themselves cost another £400,000 Green told Blunkett. It's not clear whether that includes the cost of last week's photo op, which saw Green feeding the ID register hard drives into a shredder.

Thales gets the largest share of compo, more than £2m. Oh, and it also gets the £400,000 for scrapping the data.

Blunkett raged about the cost of scrapping the system, telling the Telegraph, "Millions of pounds have been poured down the drain, not to mention the removal of a benefit freely chosen by thousands of people to help protect their identity."

Blunkett argued there was no need to destroy the data, as it could have been integrated into biometric passports "which, in years to come, will doubtless become mandatory for international travel".

While the £2.65m figure disclosed by Green sounds like a lot, it ignores the cost of asset write-offs. In a Commons answer last month, Green said the costs of scrapping the system would be £5m in the current financial year, which will be balanced by savings of £86m over the next four years.

This is of course is just a blip compared to the £330m Labour lavished on the abortive scheme. Just developing the "policy, legislation and business case" attracted a £41m price tag. ®

Application security programs and practises

More from The Register

next story
ONE EMAIL costs mining company $300 MEEELION
Environmental activist walks free after hoax sent share price over a cliff
Arrr: Freetard-bothering Digital Economy Act tied up, thrown in the hold
Ministry of Fun confirms: Yes, we're busy doing nothing
Help yourself to anyone's photos FOR FREE, suggests UK.gov
Copyright law reforms will keep m'learned friends busy
Apple smacked with privacy sueball over Location Services
Class action launched on behalf of 100 million iPhone owners
US judge: YES, cops or feds so can slurp an ENTIRE Gmail account
Crooks don't have folders labelled 'drug records', opines NY beak
UK government officially adopts Open Document Format
Microsoft insurgency fails, earns snarky remark from UK digital services head
You! Pirate! Stop pirating, or we shall admonish you politely. Repeatedly, if necessary
And we shall go about telling people you smell. No, not really
prev story

Whitepapers

Top three mobile application threats
Prevent sensitive data leakage over insecure channels or stolen mobile devices.
Implementing global e-invoicing with guaranteed legal certainty
Explaining the role local tax compliance plays in successful supply chain management and e-business and how leading global brands are addressing this.
Boost IT visibility and business value
How building a great service catalog relieves pressure points and demonstrates the value of IT service management.
Designing a Defense for Mobile Applications
Learn about the various considerations for defending mobile applications - from the application architecture itself to the myriad testing technologies.
Build a business case: developing custom apps
Learn how to maximize the value of custom applications by accelerating and simplifying their development.