Feeds

Schmidt promises to get 'permission' before taking over our world

You're in the mobile business now

Eight steps to building an HP BladeSystem

MWC Eric Schmidt wants us to love the Earth more, and tells us that the more information we share with Google the easier that will be – all with our permission of course.

Google's CEO mentioned our permission nine times during his keynote presentation at the congress yesterday, almost every point made was bracketed with the assertion that Google would do nothing to interfere with our privacy, though the search giant would like to know when our pants are wearing out, among other things.

In the world of Eric Schmidt, and by extension Google, sharing information is always a good thing – when it comes to toppling dictatorial regimes or being told we should be buying new trousers; if we share all our personal information with Google then Google will look after our lives.

Computers, empowered by Google, will make us happier by releasing more spare time so we don't have to worry about when to buy trousers, while Google Translate will prevent wars by enabling cultural understanding.

But machine translation isn't a cultural exchange, only able to convey the most-basic of meanings even when it works. It will be a while before Android trickles down into the mass populace and enables Google to claim responsibility for a revolution. There's clearly some Facebook envy going on, but not enough to didn't stop Mr Schmidt making jokes about "Google Revolution Inc".

More usefully, Schmidt talked about the merger of Gingerbread (Android for handsets) and Honeycomb (Android for tablets) which will apparently come in the spring with the next Android version.

Google also demonstrated video editing on an Android-powered, Motorola Xoom, which got carefully name-checked half-a-dozen times during the presentation – the point being that Android tablets are about creating content, not consuming it, like some other tablets that didn't get mentioned.

Not that Google admits to competing with Apple, or Facebook – Microsoft is the competition, especially now that Nokia has chosen to align itself with Redmond. Eric Schmidt was clearly upset that Nokia hadn't embraced the Android platform, and Google's ideas about how it will make life better.

But despite promising to respect our privacy, and only track our habits for our own benefit, one is left with the feeling that letting Google further into our lives might not be such a good idea, even if it happens with our permission. ®

Securing Web Applications Made Simple and Scalable

More from The Register

next story
Auntie remains MYSTIFIED by that weekend BBC iPlayer and website outage
Still doing 'forensics' on the caching layer – Beeb digi wonk
Apple orders huge MOUNTAIN of 80 MILLION 'Air' iPhone 6s
Bigger, harder trouser bulges foretold for fanbois
Bring back error correction, say Danish 'net boffins
We don't need no steenkin' TCP/IP retransmission and the congestion it causes
GoTenna: How does this 'magic' work?
An ideal product if you believe the Earth is flat
Telstra to KILL 2G network by end of 2016
GSM now stands for Grave-Seeking-Mobile network
Seeking LTE expert to insert small cells into BT customers' places
Is this the first step to a FON-a-like 4G network?
Yorkshire cops fail to grasp principle behind BT Fon Wi-Fi network
'Prevent people that are passing by to hook up to your network', pleads plod
BlackBerry: Toss the server, mate... BES is in the CLOUD now
BlackBerry Enterprise Services takes aim at SMEs - but there's a catch
prev story

Whitepapers

Designing a Defense for Mobile Applications
Learn about the various considerations for defending mobile applications - from the application architecture itself to the myriad testing technologies.
Implementing global e-invoicing with guaranteed legal certainty
Explaining the role local tax compliance plays in successful supply chain management and e-business and how leading global brands are addressing this.
Top 8 considerations to enable and simplify mobility
In this whitepaper learn how to successfully add mobile capabilities simply and cost effectively.
Seven Steps to Software Security
Seven practical steps you can begin to take today to secure your applications and prevent the damages a successful cyber-attack can cause.
Boost IT visibility and business value
How building a great service catalog relieves pressure points and demonstrates the value of IT service management.