Feeds

Julian Assange gets helping hand from OJ Simpson's briefs

WikiLeaks man pulls on snug gloves

The Power of One Infographic

Julian Assange has a new member of his defence team – Harvard Law School Professor Alan Dershowitz, who once served as an adviser on OJ Simpson's legal counsel.

The WikiLeaks' founder's head lawyer Geoffrey Robertson QC asked Dershowitz, who has famously defended clients that include Claus von Bülow, Michael Milken and Mike Tyson, to work on the case in an advisory role.

The WikiLeaks organisation will be scutinised in a federal magistrates court in the US state of Virginia later today about the Justice Department's subpoena of all messages sent via Twitter between the whistle-blower site and its supporters.

Privately held Twitter is expected to resist responding to the order to disclose the information.

"This is an outrageous attack by the Obama administration on the privacy and free speech rights of Twitter's customers – many of them American citizens," said Assange.

"More shocking, at this time, is that it amounts to an attack on the right to freedom of association, a freedom that the people of Tunisia and Egypt, for example, spurred on by the information released by WikiLeaks, have found so valuable."

WikiLeaks claimed that the likes of Google, Facebook and Yahoo! "may have" been served with a similar subpoena in December last year.

"We are all asking all service providers to explain whether they too have been served with a similar order, and whether, they have caved into it," said Assange.

He said WikiLeaks would not participate directly in today's proceedings in the Virginia court. Assange, as an Australian citizen, claimed that the US lacked jurisdiction "over expressive activities beyond its borders".

The WikiLeaks man's lawyers were in a UK court last week fighting Assange's extradition to Sweden by arguing that prosecutors had failed to follow correct procedures.

Swedish authorities want to question Assange in relation to alleged sex offences. But his defence solicitors claim that prosecutors must charge him with an offence, and therefore disclose the evidence against him, in order to qualify for extradition. ®

Maximizing your infrastructure through virtualization

More from The Register

next story
Sit back down, Julian Assange™, you're not going anywhere just yet
Swedish court refuses to withdraw arrest warrant
UK Parliament rubber-stamps EMERGENCY data grab 'n' keep bill
Just 49 MPs oppose Drip's rushed timetable
MPs wave through Blighty's 'EMERGENCY' surveillance laws
Only 49 politcos voted against DRIP bill
EU's top data cops to meet Google, Microsoft et al over 'right to be forgotten'
Plan to hammer out 'coherent' guidelines. Good luck chaps!
Delaware pair nabbed for getting saucy atop Mexican eatery
Burrito meets soft taco in alleged rooftop romp outrage
British cops cuff 660 suspected paedophiles
Arrests people allegedly accessing child abuse images online
LightSquared backer sues FCC over spectrum shindy
Why, we might as well have been buying AIR
prev story

Whitepapers

Top three mobile application threats
Prevent sensitive data leakage over insecure channels or stolen mobile devices.
The Essential Guide to IT Transformation
ServiceNow discusses three IT transformations that can help CIO's automate IT services to transform IT and the enterprise.
Mobile application security vulnerability report
The alarming realities regarding the sheer number of applications vulnerable to attack, and the most common and easily addressable vulnerability errors.
How modern custom applications can spur business growth
Learn how to create, deploy and manage custom applications without consuming or expanding the need for scarce, expensive IT resources.
Consolidation: the foundation for IT and business transformation
In this whitepaper learn how effective consolidation of IT and business resources can enable multiple, meaningful business benefits.