Feeds

Opera Mini BREWs up

The other browser comes to the other OS

The essential guide to IT transformation

Opera Mini, the proxy-served edition of the third browser, is now available on BREW MP, the OS that used to be a platform, and still claims to be relevant.

BREW MP is an embedded OS, but one that supports an app store and developer community. Support for Opera Mini should help attract those manufacturers able to see beyond the allure of Android's price tag, though Qualcomm argues its diminutive OS is cheaper in that it requires less processing power and memory, and with Opera Mini it should be able to offer a decent browsing experience too.

Not that BREW MP is making any claim to being a smart phone OS – even Qualcomm isn't that arrogant – but while other operating systems might be confident they can squeeze themselves into the feature phone space, BREW MP is already there, and Qualcomm is talking about about $50 handsets linked to operator, or Qualcomm-hosted application stores.

BREW has quite a pedigree – half a decade before the iPhone was launched operators were unreasonably rejecting applications from their BREW application stores, often without explanation or recompense. Owners of BREW handsets couldn‘t install so much as a ringtone without operator approval – just like their iPhone-owning descendants so many years later.

Since then BREW has lost its server-side component (and added MP, Mobile Platform, to its name), though it still offers in-application billing with some operators and a decent C development environment for those who don‘t want to target the latest smartphones.

Qualcomm reckons operators love BREW MP 'cos Qualcomm has no aspirations of customer ownership, while manufacturers should love it because of its minimal hardware requirements, and everyone should love the ability to run Opera Mini. But those advantages also apply to Symbian, which is as free as Android too, but Symbian hasn't got Qualcomm, or anyone else, standing behind it – which could prove critical. ®

The essential guide to IT transformation

More from The Register

next story
6 Obvious Reasons Why Facebook Will Ban This Article (Thank God)
Clampdown on clickbait ... and El Reg is OK with this
So, Apple won't sell cheap kit? Prepare the iOS garden wall WRECKING BALL
It can throw the low cost race if it looks to the cloud
Time Warner Cable customers SQUEAL as US network goes offline
A rude awakening: North Americans greeted with outage drama
Shoot-em-up: Sony Online Entertainment hit by 'large scale DDoS attack'
Games disrupted as firm struggles to control network
BT customers face broadband and landline price hikes
Poor punters won't be affected, telecoms giant claims
EE plonks 4G in UK Prime Minister's backyard
OK, his constituency. Brace yourself for EXTRA #selfies
prev story

Whitepapers

Top 10 endpoint backup mistakes
Avoid the ten endpoint backup mistakes to ensure that your critical corporate data is protected and end user productivity is improved.
Implementing global e-invoicing with guaranteed legal certainty
Explaining the role local tax compliance plays in successful supply chain management and e-business and how leading global brands are addressing this.
Backing up distributed data
Eliminating the redundant use of bandwidth and storage capacity and application consolidation in the modern data center.
The essential guide to IT transformation
ServiceNow discusses three IT transformations that can help CIOs automate IT services to transform IT and the enterprise
Next gen security for virtualised datacentres
Legacy security solutions are inefficient due to the architectural differences between physical and virtual environments.