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Samsung updates Galaxy S with two-core chip

Bada gets NFC support too

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MWC 2011 Samsung's Mobile World Congress announcements don't stop with the 10in Galaxy Tab: it's unwrapped new Galaxy S and Bada-based smartphones too - the latter with tech flavour of the month near-field comms.

The Galaxy S II, first - it's an Android 2.3 Gingerbread phone based around a 4.3in, 480 x 800 OLED touchscreen and a 1GHz dual-core CPU - the XMM6260, to be precise, from Infineon.

Samsung Galaxy S II

Samsung's Galaxy S II

That will put it up against LG's Optimus 2x, the first dual-core smartphone to be announced and due here next month.

There's an 8Mp camera on the back and a 2Mp video-call sensor on the front of the phone.

Wireless connectivity runs to 2.4GHz and 5GHz 802.11n Wi-Fi, Bluetooth 3.0 and quad-band HSPA 3G.

Samsung's storage claims are odd: it suggests the phone has 8GB of Ram, plus a choice of 16GB or 32GB of Flash, either of which can be augmented with Micro SD cards of up to 32GB capacity.

The S II - aka GT-I9100 - sits Samsung's TouchWiz II UI on top of Android's own, and adds the company's Readers, Games and Music "hubs" - Samsung's answer to iTunes.

Samsung Wave 578

Wave 578

The new Bada offerings is the Wave 578, a more budget-end smartphone with dual-band HSPA 3G, a 3.2Mp camera and a 3.2in, 240 x 432 LCD. It too has Bluetooth 3.0, but its 802.11n support only extends to the 2.4GHz band. There's no on-board storage unless you slot in a Micro SD card.

The Wave 578 will be available in May, Samsung said, but was less forthcoming about the S II's availability. ®

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