Feeds

Superphone system-CRACKING cable of DOOM ... is quite handy

MiniUSBs and common connectors are a sysadmin's best friend

High performance access to file storage

It used to be that a large part of owning a cellphone, using it a lot, and being on the road involved hauling around a massive charging unit. When your plan expired, you got a new phone – and along with that came a new car charger, a new brick to plug in at home and a second one to be wrapped up in a ball and shoved in your briefcase or purse.

This changed a while back with the adoption of MiniUSB connectors by many manufacturers. The bulky adapters were gone, replaced by a single thin cable. The car adapter was replaced by a lighter socket-to-USB converter.

Better yet, MiniUSB cables were everywhere: MP3 players, external hard drives, card readers, cameras ... you name it. Best of all, since it seemed that everything has a USB port, you could charge your phone off of just about anything.

Sadly, not everyone jumped on the MiniUSB bandwagon. Most notably reticent was Apple; MiniUSB connectors were too fat for their iconic consumer tat. The cellphone industry flailed around for a while, however they eventually settled on MicroUSB as the way of the future.

Even Apple has given way; I have been led to understand that the next round of fondle-gadgetry to come equipped with standardised connectors – for charging, at least. This is certainly the case in Europe.

Surely though, I wouldn’t be so uppity about a mere charging source? As it turns out, there’s more to it than that. The proliferation of MicroUSB – both as an interface and also in the readily available plethora of cables – is a fantastic enabler for someone looking to get around security.

When the average punter stops to ponder the abilities of their iThingy, it’s usually to marvel at how they no longer have to carry around a separate MP3 player or video player.

In many cases, they have even managed to replace their netbook with the basic browsing features of their light-up vibrating internet fondletoy. They’d be right too: without rooting the device, this is about all the average punter can really get up to on Apple’s devices.

High performance access to file storage

Next page: Thumbs up

More from The Register

next story
This time it's 'Personal': new Office 365 sub covers just two devices
Redmond also brings Office into Google's back yard
European Court of Justice rips up Data Retention Directive
Rules 'interfering' measure to be 'invalid'
Dropbox defends fantastically badly timed Condoleezza Rice appointment
'Nothing is going to change with Dr. Rice's appointment,' file sharer promises
Bored with trading oil and gold? Why not flog some CLOUD servers?
Chicago Mercantile Exchange plans cloud spot exchange
Just what could be inside Dropbox's new 'Home For Life'?
Biz apps, messaging, photos, email, more storage – sorry, did you think there would be cake?
IT bods: How long does it take YOU to train up on new tech?
I'll leave my arrays to do the hard work, if you don't mind
Amazon reveals its Google-killing 'R3' server instances
A mega-memory instance that never forgets
prev story

Whitepapers

Securing web applications made simple and scalable
In this whitepaper learn how automated security testing can provide a simple and scalable way to protect your web applications.
Five 3D headsets to be won!
We were so impressed by the Durovis Dive headset we’ve asked the company to give some away to Reg readers.
HP ArcSight ESM solution helps Finansbank
Based on their experience using HP ArcSight Enterprise Security Manager for IT security operations, Finansbank moved to HP ArcSight ESM for fraud management.
The benefits of software based PBX
Why you should break free from your proprietary PBX and how to leverage your existing server hardware.
Mobile application security study
Download this report to see the alarming realities regarding the sheer number of applications vulnerable to attack, as well as the most common and easily addressable vulnerability errors.