Feeds

Ofcom okays Derren Brown psychic-baiting

Opinion of regulator's dead relatives pending

Top 5 reasons to deploy VMware with Tegile

Ofcom has ruled that the psychic at the centre of an episode of Derren Brown Investigates was treated fairly.

The show, which was broadcast by Channel 4 in May, centred on Joe Power, a Liverpool psychic who claimed he could talk to the dead.

Power claimed that he didn't know the show, which featured Derren Brown following him around and pointing out how easy it would be to fake psychic communications, would be a sceptical presentation, apparently unaware of his own (recorded) statements saying how much he was looking forward to exactly that.

Brown has never made any secret of his disdain for those who reckon they can speak to the dead, demonstrating time and again how the same results can be achieved through careful observation and good guesses: if you're as bright as Derren Brown, at least. Nor did Power seem unaware of these options, in recorded interviews which went against him during the investigation.

"He's a well-known sceptic," Power had concluded in an interview with programme-makers made before he signed up for the show. "Why can't a sceptic meet a genuine medium?"

Ofcom stated that "Mr Power clearly understood that Mr Brown was a sceptic". But that didn't stop Power claiming to be under the impression that the programme was called Derren Brown Unexplained, and wouldn't question his abilities.

Complaints about specific elements, such as a crew member's testimony that Power was in the car park when Hollyoaks actress Claire Cooper pulled up in her Mini (he later astounded her by psychically deducing that she indeed owned a Mini), were also rejected on the grounds that Channel 4 included Power's denial of the events - leaving it to viewers to decide whose word they trusted more.

As the regulator puts it, "Accordingly, Ofcom has not upheld Mr Power’s complaint of unfair treatment in the programme as broadcast." ®

Choosing a cloud hosting partner with confidence

More from The Register

next story
Facebook pays INFINITELY MORE UK corp tax than in 2012
Thanks for the £3k, Zuck. Doh! you're IN CREDIT. Guess not
Big Content outs piracy hotbeds: São Paulo, Beijing ... TORONTO?
MPAA calls Canadians a bunch of bootlegging movie thieves
Google Glassholes are UNDATEABLE – HP exec
You need an emotional connection, says touchy-feely MD... We can do that
YARR! Pirates walk the plank: DMCA magnets sink in Google results
Spaffing copyrighted stuff over the web? No search ranking for you
Just don't blame Bono! Apple iTunes music sales PLUMMET
Cupertino revenue hit by cheapo downloads, says report
Hungary's internet tax cannot be allowed to set a precedent, says EC
More protests planned against giga-tariff for Tuesday evening
US court SHUTS DOWN 'scammers posing as Microsoft, Facebook support staff'
Netizens allegedly duped into paying for bogus tech advice
Verizon bankrolls tech news site, bans tech's biggest stories
No agenda here. Just don't ever mention Net neutrality or spying, ok?
prev story

Whitepapers

Choosing cloud Backup services
Demystify how you can address your data protection needs in your small- to medium-sized business and select the best online backup service to meet your needs.
A strategic approach to identity relationship management
ForgeRock commissioned Forrester to evaluate companies’ IAM practices and requirements when it comes to customer-facing scenarios versus employee-facing ones.
Reg Reader Research: SaaS based Email and Office Productivity Tools
Read this Reg reader report which provides advice and guidance for SMBs towards the use of SaaS based email and Office productivity tools.
New hybrid storage solutions
Tackling data challenges through emerging hybrid storage solutions that enable optimum database performance whilst managing costs and increasingly large data stores.
Business security measures using SSL
Examines the major types of threats to information security that businesses face today and the techniques for mitigating those threats.