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PS3 to float into cloud

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Sony has popped its head in the cloud and informed developers of a feature to store saved game data online.

The ability to then load saved game data onto various consoles, from the PS3 to the upcoming NGP - aka PSP 2 - is a welcomed attribute, but could there be more to this cloud-based service than meets the eye?

Gaming blogger Peter Smith thinks so and claims Sony is almost ready to spill the beans on bringing PlayStation Suite content to the PS3.

Smith points to an Engadget interview with CEO Jack Tretton, who initially said Suite games would work across all platforms, not just NGP and Android devices. Tretton soon retracted his statement - a sign Sony wasn't officially ready to reveal the information, says Smith.

This is furthered by a revelation at Sony's Playstation Meeting 2011, when game developer Hideo Kojima said he hoped to offer the same games on the PS3 and NGP, with save data stored in the cloud.

Sony's upcoming 3.60 firmware update will include the "Online Saving" feature, according to Kotaku. ®

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