Feeds

China drafts in parent army to battle internet addiction

One child, two hours a week policy

New hybrid storage solutions

China has sought to battle the scourge of internet addiction among the youth by giving parents the right to monitor their offspring's online meanderings.

Eight government departments have issued new guidelines due to come into force from next month.

These will allow, among other things, parents to set restrictions on their kids' online time, which service providers will be obliged to respect.

Operators are urged to set aside staff to deal with the project. The ministries, including the Ministry of Public Security, said children shouldn't spend more than two hours a week playing online games, or spend more than $1.50 a month on such services.

Xinhua reported the project had been piloted last year, and have "proved effective in helping juveniles overcome addictions to online games".

Reactions to the dictat didn't hold much hope for an end to China's growing army of net addicts. If anything, the grown-ups appear to have already thrown in the towel in the hope of an easy life.

"It's unnecessary and it will prompt more rebelliousness from the children," one father glumly told the China Daily newspaper, AFP reports.

Meanwhile, Gu Jun, a sociologist at Shanghai University, said the order seemed unfeasible and a recipe for family conflicts.

While there have been reports of children being pushed to the limit in unauthorised net addiction boot camps, the kids have also pushed back. Last June, 14 kids staged a daring break-out from one camp which was only foiled when it turned out they didn't have the cash to pay their getaway driver - a taxi. ®

Providing a secure and efficient Helpdesk

More from The Register

next story
Net neutrality protestors slam the brakes on their OWN websites
Sites link up to protest slow lanes by bogging down pages
Found inside ISIS terror chap's laptop: CELINE DION tunes
REPORT: Stash of terrorist material found in Syria Dell box
Uber alles-holes, claims lawsuit: Taxi biz sued by blind passengers
Sueball claims blind passengers ditched, guide dogs abused
Drag queens: Oh, don't be so bitchy, Facebook! Let us use our stage names
Handbags at dawn over free content ad network's ID policy
Italy's High Court orders HP to refund punter for putting Windows on PC
Top beaks slam bundled OS as 'commercial policy of forced distribution'
Show us your Five-Eyes SECRETS says Privacy International
Refusal to disclose GCHQ canteen menus and prices triggers Euro Human Rights Court action
Heavy VPN users are probably pirates, says BBC
And ISPs should nab 'em on our behalf
prev story

Whitepapers

Secure remote control for conventional and virtual desktops
Balancing user privacy and privileged access, in accordance with compliance frameworks and legislation. Evaluating any potential remote control choice.
Intelligent flash storage arrays
Tegile Intelligent Storage Arrays with IntelliFlash helps IT boost storage utilization and effciency while delivering unmatched storage savings and performance.
Reg Reader Research: SaaS based Email and Office Productivity Tools
Read this Reg reader report which provides advice and guidance for SMBs towards the use of SaaS based email and Office productivity tools.
Security for virtualized datacentres
Legacy security solutions are inefficient due to the architectural differences between physical and virtual environments.
Providing a secure and efficient Helpdesk
A single remote control platform for user support is be key to providing an efficient helpdesk. Retain full control over the way in which screen and keystroke data is transmitted.