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Australia’s emerging cloud computing market for the enterprise set is getting competitive with the entry of tier-two carrier Macquarie Telecom.

The telco has launched a managed service - the Macquarie Telecom Enterprise Cloud - up against carriers Telstra and Optus and global managed services operators such as Orange Business Services already aggressive in the cloud space.

Macquarie claims that demand for corporate cloud services locally is strong and reflected in the 30 per cent year-on-year growth in its managed infrastructure and hosting business over the last three years.

Rival Telstra sealed a three-year partnership deal with Accenture last year targeting the top end of town for the delivery of cloud computing services. While in October, Optus subsidiary Alphawest launched its enterprise cloud service delivered via the Optus Evolve network.

“Our commitment to providing enterprise cloud services in Australia directly reflects customer demand and market sentiment for locally based enterprise-grade cloud services,” said Aidan Tudehope, Managing Director Hosting, Macquarie Telecom.

Tudehope described the offering as the broadest and deepest cloud platform in Australia, with the “ability to burst on demand from existing infrastructure without the need for additional capital expenditure”.

All new Macquarie cloud customers will be given their own ‘personal cloud architect’, trained to recommend cloud, access, security, and usage models. The service is backed by Macquarie Telecom’s owned and managed customer service centre, the MacquarieHUB, which launched in July 2010.

Tudehope says that Macqurie’s commitment to managed services is a key differentiator. “In the past year, many Australian organisations have conducted user and scenario testing using clickwrap agreements in public cloud environments but unmanaged clouds are not practical for ongoing corporate production services due to latency issues and security concerns; with our locally hosted offering organisations can now trust the cloud and enter into full production in this managed secure environment.”

In October Macquarie announced that it was investing $60m in a new Sydney based datacentre known as "Intellicentre 2" which is expected to be completed in late 2011. ®

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