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Toshiba shows second-gen tablet

Bit on the bulky side?

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Toshiba has coughed up some of the specs its upcoming Android Honeycomb tablet will sport.

According to a teaser site for the product, the tablet will be based around a 10.1in, 1280 x 800 capacitive touchscreen, contain an Nvidia Tegra 2 processor, and combine 0.2Mp and 5MP front- and rear-facing cameras.

Toshiba tablet

Pictures show the tablet will have HDMI, USB - mini and full size - SD and analogue audio portage. It has Wi-Fi connectivity, the site says, though it would be more of a surprise if it didn't.

Oh, and the textured back comes off to allow you to swap out the battery.

Of course, what the site doesn't reveal are the tablets dimensions, and it's not hard to see why: with all those ports needing to be fit into the side, plus the extra space having a removable battery inevitably requires, this is one thick gadget.

Toshiba tablet

Couple that with the big screen and you're looking at a rather large, heavy device. Anyone who thinks the iPad is too big isn't going to take to this one.

The Toshiba tablet, successor to the ill-fated Folio 100 Toshiba shipped into the UK last autumn, will be out in the spring. ®

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