Feeds

Ubuntu Qt equality promised post Narwhal

'Not a criticism of GNOME'

Boost IT visibility and business value

Ubuntu is getting enhanced support for Qt tools, paving the way for wider deployment of the Linux distro on a range of devices.

Ubuntu founder Mark Shuttleworth has blogged that Canonical is driving development of dconf bindings for Qt and that it's working with dconf expert Ryan Lortie.

The idea is that with a release of Ubuntu after Natty Narwhal in April, Qt apps will be able to use the same framework as other Ubuntu apps. "We're confident the result will be natural for Qt developers, and a complete expression of dconf's semantics and style," Shuttleworth said.

Shuttleworth positioned the move as providing choice by putting Qt on an equal footing in the Ubuntu ecosystem and distro. Qt libraries will be put on future Ubuntu CDs.

"We will evaluate applications developed with Qt for inclusion on the CD and default install of Ubuntu," Shuttleworth said.

Qt is a cross-platform application and UI framework that runs on Windows, Linux, and Mac. It lets you write a single web-enabled application for deployment on desktop, mobile and embedded systems.

It's been Shuttleworth's mission to put Ubuntu in a greater number of embedded devices, such as in-car systems.

Qt customers include Genivi, which offers in-car systems; the European Space Agency; and Nokia's Windows7-based Booklet 3G and Asus EeePC running Linux. Nokia bought Qt maker Trolltech for $153m in 2008.

Shuttleworth said the decision to be more open to Qt is not a criticism of GNOME. Nice words, but GNOME has been demoted as the default interface after six years in Natty Narwhal in favor of Ubuntu's Unity multi-touch interface. GNOME will be offered as a non-standard installation.

Shuttleworth said at the time that GNOME was slipping behind in development. Unity will mean a new application dock and launch bar as well as multi-touch application use. Unity started as Ubuntu's interface for netbooks and devices, but it has graduated up to desktops. ®

5 things you didn’t know about cloud backup

More from The Register

next story
Munich considers dumping Linux for ... GULP ... Windows!
Give a penguinista a hug, the Outlook's not good for open source's poster child
The Return of BSOD: Does ANYONE trust Microsoft patches?
Sysadmins, you're either fighting fires or seen as incompetents now
Intel's Raspberry Pi rival Galileo can now run Windows
Behold the Internet of Things. Wintel Things
Microsoft cries UNINSTALL in the wake of Blue Screens of Death™
Cache crash causes contained choloric calamity
Eat up Martha! Microsoft slings handwriting recog into OneNote on Android
Freehand input on non-Windows kit for the first time
Time to move away from Windows 7 ... whoa, whoa, who said anything about Windows 8?
Start migrating now to avoid another XPocalypse – Gartner
You'll find Yoda at the back of every IT conference
The piss always taking is he. Bastard the.
prev story

Whitepapers

5 things you didn’t know about cloud backup
IT departments are embracing cloud backup, but there’s a lot you need to know before choosing a service provider. Learn all the critical things you need to know.
Implementing global e-invoicing with guaranteed legal certainty
Explaining the role local tax compliance plays in successful supply chain management and e-business and how leading global brands are addressing this.
Build a business case: developing custom apps
Learn how to maximize the value of custom applications by accelerating and simplifying their development.
Rethinking backup and recovery in the modern data center
Combining intelligence, operational analytics, and automation to enable efficient, data-driven IT organizations using the HP ABR approach.
Next gen security for virtualised datacentres
Legacy security solutions are inefficient due to the architectural differences between physical and virtual environments.