Feeds

Google dispenses first jackpot award to security bug hunter

Elite bug-finder handed $3,133.7(0) reward

Remote control for virtualized desktops

Google updated its Chrome browser software on Wednesday to address a variety of security bugs, including the first vulnerability to qualify its finder for the recently introduced top-tier of its Chromium Security Reward scheme.

Sergey Glazunov earns an “elite” $3,133.7 award for his bug-finding efforts as well as pocketing the base-line $1,337 reward and other incentives for the discovery of lesser bugs, also resolved by the latest cross-platform browser security update.

Glazunov's major find was a crucial flaw involving a "pointer in speech handling". He also found four "high" risk vulnerabilities variously involving video and anchor handling as well as miscued pointers. In total the 8.0.552.237 release addresses one critical flaw, 13 "high-risk" bugs and two less severe medium-danger vulnerabilities, as detailed in Google's bulletin here. The ad broker paid a total of $14,000 in security awards to various researchers.

Google is withholding details of the respective bugs until users have a reasonable chance to apply security fixes – in case the added details might help the bad guys to develop workable exploits. ®

Secure remote control for conventional and virtual desktops

More from The Register

next story
PEAK APPLE: iOS 8 is least popular Cupertino mobile OS in all of HUMAN HISTORY
'Nerd release' finally staggers past 50 per cent adoption
Microsoft to bake Skype into IE, without plugins
Redmond thinks the Object Real-Time Communications API for WebRTC is ready to roll
Microsoft promises Windows 10 will mean two-factor auth for all
Sneak peek at security features Redmond's baking into new OS
Mozilla: Spidermonkey ATE Apple's JavaScriptCore, THRASHED Google V8
Moz man claims the win on rivals' own benchmarks
Yes, Virginia, there IS a W3C HTML5 standard – as of now, that is
You asked for it! You begged for it! Then you gave up! And now it's HERE!
FTDI yanks chip-bricking driver from Windows Update, vows to fight on
Next driver to battle fake chips with 'non-invasive' methods
DEATH by PowerPoint: Microsoft warns of 0-day attack hidden in slides
Might put out patch in update, might chuck it out sooner
Ubuntu 14.10 tries pulling a Steve Ballmer on cloudy offerings
Oi, Windows, centOS and openSUSE – behave, we're all friends here
prev story

Whitepapers

Choosing cloud Backup services
Demystify how you can address your data protection needs in your small- to medium-sized business and select the best online backup service to meet your needs.
Getting started with customer-focused identity management
Learn why identity is a fundamental requirement to digital growth, and how without it there is no way to identify and engage customers in a meaningful way.
High Performance for All
While HPC is not new, it has traditionally been seen as a specialist area – is it now geared up to meet more mainstream requirements?
Intelligent flash storage arrays
Tegile Intelligent Storage Arrays with IntelliFlash helps IT boost storage utilization and effciency while delivering unmatched storage savings and performance.
The Heartbleed Bug: how to protect your business with Symantec
What happens when the next Heartbleed (or worse) comes along, and what can you do to weather another chapter in an all-too-familiar string of debilitating attacks?