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Dual flash and disk desktops

Lenovo's RapidDrive technology

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Desktop users want faster boot and app load times just as much as notebook users and dual flash and hard disk drive systems could provide both.

Intel and Lenovo announced ThinkPad notebooks at CES last week, featuring both solid state drives (SSD) and hard drives (HDD) with 40GB or 80GB of Intel 310 flash used for storing the BIOS, operating system boot and application load, and a 2.5-inch HDD used for bulk data storage. A 9.7 second boot time was demo'd.

Desktop users would like some of that too, please. They would relish the affordability of a hybrid SSD/HDD system over an SSD-only system. A 40 or 80 gig SSD is much more meaningful storage capacity-wise than the 4GB flash cache used on Seagate's Momentus XT disk drive.

With Lenovo showing the notebook way at CES how long can it be before mainstream PC makers apply the same technology idea to PCs, with Ferrari-class multi-core processors slowed down to walking speed by Windows bloatware? ®

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