Feeds

Diary of a Not-spot: The readers speak

A wooden horse, a pole and a whip just for show

7 Elements of Radically Simple OS Migration

Speaking of wooden horses...

Speaking of the wooden horse, several readers mailed to ask for details of its construction, though I wouldn't recommend the roof-straddling technology as an ideal solution here are some details:

The horse in construction

The legs are 75mm fence posts, bolted together using a length of thread and M10 bolts at each end. The other bits of wood are a redundant high chair while the curved metal pole came with the Solwise kit.

The horse in close up

The horizontal bars were added in situ as I couldn't heft the thing up in one piece

The additional height, not pictured, was achieved with a couple of slotted shelving mounts held in place with jubilee clips - which have stood up to local storms surprisingly well though I don't think I can stretch the height any further without rethinking the design.

A smaller dish, and/or better radio makes sense, and several people pointed out that Ubiquiti make something suitable. An external antenna is a pain as there's nowhere on the roof to put the radio (let alone a separate laptop with a USB Wi-Fi point, as several people suggested - there's no mains power up there and the fewer boxes there are the less likely they'll come crashing down). Ubiquiti's NanoBridge comes with a 25dbi dish, which looks feasible and I'll probably pick up a couple of those in the New Year, weather permitting.

None of this would be necessary if my neighbours hadn't shunned my Ethernet connection, and the sympathy of readers was appreciated. Several people questioned the use of CAT-5 over 150m, but when it worked it worked fine. Not that it worked for long, and should I be trying the same thing again I'd certainly take the advice to bury some hose pipe by way of conduit.

A couple of readers suggested linking together buildings is dangerous in itself, as a potential difference may build up between the two if they have separate earths. I hadn't heard about this so checked with a suitably-qualified spark who agreed that it could happen, though considered it very unlikely - especially given that the houses nearby will probably share the same earth (at the local sub station, the houses being reasonably new and stake-in-the-ground-earth being rare in the UK these days). Even if the earth connections were separate a shock would require multiple failures, and be cut off by any modern fuse box, so overall a good deal safer than climbing around on the roof with insufficient safety equipment but something to consider if you're planning anything similar.

Several people asked why I didn't stick with satellite - one can get used to the latency, and I accept that not all satellite companies are as inept as the ones I used, but there's still something wrong in sending packets up to geostationary orbit and down again. If nothing else works, and Hughes starts selling connections over Avanti's new bird, then I'm still prepared to consider it.

But first I'll get some Ubiquiti kit and see if that helps, then perhaps some mast building to gain height, but none of that until the snow and ice is gone. So thanks loads for all the feedback, every message is appreciated, and when I've progress to report I'll be sure to let you know. ®

Best practices for enterprise data

More from The Register

next story
Sysadmin Day 2014: Quick, there's still time to get the beers in
He walked over the broken glass, killed the thugs... and er... reconnected the cables*
VMware builds product executables on 50 Mac Minis
And goes to the Genius Bar for support
Multipath TCP speeds up the internet so much that security breaks
Black Hat research says proposed protocol will bork network probes, flummox firewalls
Auntie remains MYSTIFIED by that weekend BBC iPlayer and website outage
Still doing 'forensics' on the caching layer – Beeb digi wonk
Microsoft's Euro cloud darkens: US FEDS can dig into foreign servers
They're not emails, they're business records, says court
Microsoft says 'weird things' can happen during Windows Server 2003 migrations
Fix coming for bug that makes Kerberos croak when you run two domain controllers
Cisco says network virtualisation won't pay off everywhere
Another sign of strain in the Borg/VMware relationship?
prev story

Whitepapers

7 Elements of Radically Simple OS Migration
Avoid the typical headaches of OS migration during your next project by learning about 7 elements of radically simple OS migration.
Implementing global e-invoicing with guaranteed legal certainty
Explaining the role local tax compliance plays in successful supply chain management and e-business and how leading global brands are addressing this.
Consolidation: The Foundation for IT Business Transformation
In this whitepaper learn how effective consolidation of IT and business resources can enable multiple, meaningful business benefits.
Solving today's distributed Big Data backup challenges
Enable IT efficiency and allow a firm to access and reuse corporate information for competitive advantage, ultimately changing business outcomes.
A new approach to endpoint data protection
What is the best way to ensure comprehensive visibility, management, and control of information on both company-owned and employee-owned devices?