Feeds

Labour moots using speed cameras to reward law-abiding drivers

Like having Nanny in the car with you. Permanently

Internet Security Threat Report 2014

The new shadow transport minister has suggested that the country's network of average speed cameras could be used to monitor and reward careful drivers with prizes, cheaper car tax, or by deducting penalty points from their licence.

Conscious that her party was perceived as anti-motorist when in government, Angela Eagle suggested such uses for the cameras "might make people understand there is a point to [them]" she told The Daily Telegraph.

"The speed cameras are capturing the data, the speed and number plates of the cars that go through," she said.

"I have seen lately this idea actually if you were to use the information you get from them to have a lottery, have a draw of those who drive under the speed limit.

"There is an incentive for good behaviour which is perhaps better psychologically than a disincentive for bad behaviour."

The antipathy between the Labour government and motorists peaked when ministers announced plans in 2007 to introduce pay-per-mile road usage charges, based on vehicle tracking technology. In response, 1.8 million signed a petition on the then-new Downing street petitions site, and the government was forced to back down.

Eagle accepted that motorists perceived Labour's enthusiasm for speed cameras was motivated by concern for revenue generation.

"It was felt that cameras were about catching them on the hop and fining them, money raising arrangement rather than a road safety arrangement,"

However, much criticism over the Labour road policies was prompted not only by their cost, but also by concern over government intrusion and information gathering.

Eagle's ideas for average speed cameras do not address such privacy criticisms, and in fact might intensify them. Using the system to capture and store more data about law-abiding drivers, even if it is to enter them into a prize lottery, may not represent the break with the past in the minds of voters that Ed Miliband envisaged when he said his party's policy programme was a blank sheet of paper. ®

Top 5 reasons to deploy VMware with Tegile

More from The Register

next story
Facebook pays INFINITELY MORE UK corp tax than in 2012
Thanks for the £3k, Zuck. Doh! you're IN CREDIT. Guess not
DOUBLE BONK: Testy fanbois catch Apple Pay picking pockets
Users wail as tapcash transactions are duplicated
Happiness economics is bollocks. Oh, UK.gov just adopted it? Er ...
Opportunity doesn't knock; it costs us instead
Google Glassholes are UNDATEABLE – HP exec
You need an emotional connection, says touchy-feely MD... We can do that
YARR! Pirates walk the plank: DMCA magnets sink in Google results
Spaffing copyrighted stuff over the web? No search ranking for you
prev story

Whitepapers

Why cloud backup?
Combining the latest advancements in disk-based backup with secure, integrated, cloud technologies offer organizations fast and assured recovery of their critical enterprise data.
A strategic approach to identity relationship management
ForgeRock commissioned Forrester to evaluate companies’ IAM practices and requirements when it comes to customer-facing scenarios versus employee-facing ones.
Security for virtualized datacentres
Legacy security solutions are inefficient due to the architectural differences between physical and virtual environments.
Reg Reader Research: SaaS based Email and Office Productivity Tools
Read this Reg reader report which provides advice and guidance for SMBs towards the use of SaaS based email and Office productivity tools.
New hybrid storage solutions
Tackling data challenges through emerging hybrid storage solutions that enable optimum database performance whilst managing costs and increasingly large data stores.