Feeds

Intel unveils itsy-bitsy, teeny-weeny SSDs

Same performance, one-eighth the size.

  • alert
  • submit to reddit

Top 5 reasons to deploy VMware with Tegile

Intel announced on Wednesday a new line of tiny solid-state drives, the SSD 310 series, that have performance specs comparable to those of their 2.5-inch X-25 and 1.8-inch X-18 SSD brethren – and at least one manufacturer is already on board to put the little fellows into dual-drive notebooks.

"The Intel SSD 310 series will allow us to provide the advantages of a full-performance Intel SSD paired with the storage of a hard disk drive in a small, dual-drive system," Lenovo's ThinkPad honcho Tom Butler said in a prepared statement.

A dual-drive system will allow users to put their system and apps on the SDD for fast boot and launch times, while storing their files and data on relatively pokey, inexpensive 2.5-inch hard drives.

Intel SSD 310

The latest example of how storage systems are shrinking

The SSD 310 series devices – available in 40GB and 80GB capacities, both composed of 34nm NAND chips – are small, indeed. Intel crows that the devices are "up to 8 times smaller than a 2.5-inch hard-disk drive," but that characterization takes all three axes – width, length, and thickness – into account.

To be exact, your mainstream 2.5-inch HDD is typically 70mm wide, 100mm long, and 9.5mm thick. The SDD 310 series devices are 29.85mm wide, 50.80mm long, and a bit less than 4.85mm thick. A typical 2.5-inch HDD weighs between 95 and 105gm, while the SSD 310s weigh under 10gm.

Intel 310 SSD

Ten years ago, would you have thought a 2.5-inch drive could ever look so gargantuan?

On paper, the performance of the SSD 310s stacks up quite nicely when compared with that of the Intel X18-M and X18-M Mainstream SSDs, as well as with that of a snappy 7200rpm 2.5-inch HDD such as the Hitachi Travelstar Z7K320, not to mention a garden-variety 5400rpm 2.5-incher such as the Travelstar 5K320.

Although comparing an SSD's sustained read/write rates with Hitachi's advertised media transfer rates is not as exact a comparison as we'd prefer, it's what we have to go on:

Intel 310 SSD comparison stats

If not exactly apples to oranges, perhaps at least Granny Smiths to Gravensteins

The SSD 310 series also matches the X18/25-M series' MTBF of 1.2 million hours and operating shock of 1,500G/0.5ms – far superior to the Travelstar Z7K320's 400G/2ms, 225G/1ms and the 5K320's 400G/2ms, 200G/1ms.

The SSD 310 series is already shipping to customers, and at decent prices – for SSDs – when purchased in 1,000-unit quantities: $99 for 40GB and $179 for 80GB. ®

Beginner's guide to SSL certificates

More from The Register

next story
Ellison: Sparc M7 is Oracle's most important silicon EVER
'Acceleration engines' key to performance, security, Larry says
Oracle SHELLSHOCKER - data titan lists unpatchables
Database kingpin lists 32 products that can't be patched (yet) as GNU fixes second vuln
Lenovo to finish $2.1bn IBM x86 server gobble in October
A lighter snack than expected – but what's a few $100m between friends, eh?
Ello? ello? ello?: Facebook challenger in DDoS KNOCKOUT
Gets back up again after half an hour though
Troll hunter Rackspace turns Rotatable's bizarro patent to stone
News of the Weird: Screen-rotating technology declared unpatentable
prev story

Whitepapers

Forging a new future with identity relationship management
Learn about ForgeRock's next generation IRM platform and how it is designed to empower CEOS's and enterprises to engage with consumers.
Storage capacity and performance optimization at Mizuno USA
Mizuno USA turn to Tegile storage technology to solve both their SAN and backup issues.
The next step in data security
With recent increased privacy concerns and computers becoming more powerful, the chance of hackers being able to crack smaller-sized RSA keys increases.
Security for virtualized datacentres
Legacy security solutions are inefficient due to the architectural differences between physical and virtual environments.
A strategic approach to identity relationship management
ForgeRock commissioned Forrester to evaluate companies’ IAM practices and requirements when it comes to customer-facing scenarios versus employee-facing ones.