Feeds

Adobe forgets to thank Apple as it hits $1bn per quarter

Was it down to tough love?

Boost IT visibility and business value

Adobe put a troublesome year behind it yesterday, announcing its first ever billion-dollar quarter and jacking up its forecasts for next year.

The developer and creative software vendor turned in revenues of $1bn for its fourth quarter ending 3 December, well up on last year's $757.3m, and ahead of the $998m Wall Street was expecting. That was split between subscription revenues of $100.4m – up from $36.9m – and product revenues of $830.9m, up from $670.4m. The balance was made up from service and support revenues.

Net income came in at $268.9m – compared to last year's $32m loss – and delivered earnings per share came in at $0.56 non-GAAP, ahead of Wall Street's forecast of $0.52.

The company capped off the numbers by forecasting Q1 revenues of $1bn to $1.05bn, with earnings of $0.54 to $0.59 non-GAAP, again an advance on current forecasts.

The figures produced a bullish response from CEO and president Shantanu Narayen, who claimed the firm was "one of the most diversified software companies in the world and are entering 2011 with strong momentum".

The firm's bullishness is all the more remarkable since Apple boss Steve Jobs famously laid into it earlier in the year, exiling its Flash platform from its mobile devices.

Which raises the possibility that Steve was simply giving Adobe some tough love in an effort to get it to sort out some of its software's shortcomings and look at the world beyond Apple. However, it doesn't seem that Narayen chose to thank Steve for this little prompt yesterday. ®

The essential guide to IT transformation

More from The Register

next story
Munich considers dumping Linux for ... GULP ... Windows!
Give a penguinista a hug, the Outlook's not good for open source's poster child
The Return of BSOD: Does ANYONE trust Microsoft patches?
Sysadmins, you're either fighting fires or seen as incompetents now
Intel's Raspberry Pi rival Galileo can now run Windows
Behold the Internet of Things. Wintel Things
Microsoft cries UNINSTALL in the wake of Blue Screens of Death™
Cache crash causes contained choloric calamity
Eat up Martha! Microsoft slings handwriting recog into OneNote on Android
Freehand input on non-Windows kit for the first time
Time to move away from Windows 7 ... whoa, whoa, who said anything about Windows 8?
Start migrating now to avoid another XPocalypse – Gartner
You'll find Yoda at the back of every IT conference
The piss always taking is he. Bastard the.
prev story

Whitepapers

5 things you didn’t know about cloud backup
IT departments are embracing cloud backup, but there’s a lot you need to know before choosing a service provider. Learn all the critical things you need to know.
Implementing global e-invoicing with guaranteed legal certainty
Explaining the role local tax compliance plays in successful supply chain management and e-business and how leading global brands are addressing this.
Build a business case: developing custom apps
Learn how to maximize the value of custom applications by accelerating and simplifying their development.
Rethinking backup and recovery in the modern data center
Combining intelligence, operational analytics, and automation to enable efficient, data-driven IT organizations using the HP ABR approach.
Next gen security for virtualised datacentres
Legacy security solutions are inefficient due to the architectural differences between physical and virtual environments.