Feeds

Google 'Crankshaft' inspired by Sun Java HotSpot

Bak to 'adaptive compilation'

Choosing a cloud hosting partner with confidence

Google's new "Crankshaft" JavaScript engine was inspired at least in part by Sun's Java Hotspot performance engine, the reengineered Java virtual machine that Sun released in 1999.

A number of developers who built Crankshaft, including Danish programmer Lars Bak, also worked on HotSpot. Bak led the HotSpot team at Sun, and he's one of the founders of Google's V8 JavaScript engine.

Crankshaft is similar to Mozilla's TraceMonkey-JagerMonkey JavaScript engine setup in that it seeks to optimize certain pieces of code. "At a simple level, they both do dynamic optimization. There's one version of the code that gets 'hot,' gets important, and they take a deeper pass on that code," Google engineer Eric Kay said this morning at the annual Add-on-Con browser conference in Mountain View, California, when we asked about the Crankshaft design and how it compares to Mozilla's engine.

But whereas TraceMonkey uses a technique called "tracing" – detecting code loops and converting them into assembly language – Google's Crankshaft uses an approach known as "adaptive compilation" whereby it identifies all sorts of hot code and optimizes whole methods of code as needed. Sun's HotSpot was based on adaptive compilation, and according to Kay the idea of adding adaptive compilation to the V8 engine has long been on Google's roadmap.

Crankshaft includes four complementary components. In addition to a base compiler, there's a runtime profile that identifies hot code. Then an optimizing compiler recompiles the hot code to offer such optimizations as loop-invariant code motion, linear-scan register allocation, and inlining. Lastly, Google includes "deoptimization support" that identifies cases where the optimizing compiler has promised too much optimization. When this happens, the engine falls back on the base compiler. ®

Intelligent flash storage arrays

More from The Register

next story
UNIX greybeards threaten Debian fork over systemd plan
'Veteran Unix Admins' fear desktop emphasis is betraying open source
Netscape Navigator - the browser that started it all - turns 20
It was 20 years ago today, Marc Andreeesen taught the band to play
Redmond top man Satya Nadella: 'Microsoft LOVES Linux'
Open-source 'love' fairly runneth over at cloud event
Return of the Jedi – Apache reclaims web server crown
.london, .hamburg and .公司 - that's .com in Chinese - storm the web server charts
Chrome 38's new HTML tag support makes fatties FIT and SKINNIER
First browser to protect networks' bandwith using official spec
Admins! Never mind POODLE, there're NEW OpenSSL bugs to splat
Four new patches for open-source crypto libraries
prev story

Whitepapers

Forging a new future with identity relationship management
Learn about ForgeRock's next generation IRM platform and how it is designed to empower CEOS's and enterprises to engage with consumers.
Cloud and hybrid-cloud data protection for VMware
Learn how quick and easy it is to configure backups and perform restores for VMware environments.
Three 1TB solid state scorchers up for grabs
Big SSDs can be expensive but think big and think free because you could be the lucky winner of one of three 1TB Samsung SSD 840 EVO drives that we’re giving away worth over £300 apiece.
Reg Reader Research: SaaS based Email and Office Productivity Tools
Read this Reg reader report which provides advice and guidance for SMBs towards the use of SaaS based email and Office productivity tools.
Security for virtualized datacentres
Legacy security solutions are inefficient due to the architectural differences between physical and virtual environments.