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Wikileaks whistle-blower: Where's the money, Julian?

Bradley Manning fund hasn't got a penny

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"There has been an unconscionable failure [in conventional journalism] to protect sources. It is those sources who take all the risks... journalists don't take their job seriously" - Julian Assange.

In the rush to beatify St Julian d'Assange, one figure in the Wikileaks saga has been overlooked.

US Army Private Bradley Manning has been in solitary confinement at Marine Corps Base Quantico in Virginia since July, suspected of leaking material, including the diplomatic cables, to Wikileaks. Manning was turned in by former hacker Adrian Lamo, who passed his details onto WiReD.

Manning's defense fund has raised over $90,000 - but not a penny has been received from Wikileaks, as was promised, the legal team has confirmed in a statement.

"Immediately following Bradley’s arrest in late June 2010, the whistle-blower website Wikileaks publicly solicited donations specifically for Bradley’s legal defense expenses," notes the BMSN.

"In July 2010, Wikileaks pledged to contribute a 'substantial amount' towards Bradley’s legal defense costs. Since Bradley’s selection of David Coombs as his civilian defense attorney in August 2010, the Bradley Manning Support Network has unsuccessfully attempted to facilitate the pledged Wikileaks contribution.

"We’re forced to clarify that Wikileaks has not yet made a contribution towards this effort. We certainly welcome any contribution from Wikileaks, but we need to inform our supporters that it may not be forthcoming and that their continued contributions and support are crucial."

Earlier this week, Cryptome site operator John Young described Wikileaks as a commercial operation from the outset. This view is bolstered by this curious story via a Reg reader:

Three years ago, a friend of mine saw someone from Wikileaks speak, and they mentioned that they were looking for mirrors. Afterwards, he emailed them, saying that he'd be prepared to do it if they'd give him an rsync end point. They replied saying that if he wanted to help, he could donate money. His reaction was the same as John Young's, that this was an organisation out to make money.

Money comes into Wikileaks - but it doesn't come out. Readers outraged by the "persecution" of the narcissistic Assange may wish to consider where their sympathies really should lie. Without Manning, there would be no Wikileaks sensation. ®

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