Feeds

Massive online database of bird calls unveiled

Extensive contributions from the 'Brown Thrasher'

Secure remote control for conventional and virtual desktops

Twitchers among the Reg readership – and there must be a few of you, it's a hobby based on obsessive knowledge of minutiae and enhanced by gadgets – take heed. A massive online database of bird calls has been made available free online for your listening enjoyment.

Professor Pamela Rasmussen. Credit: MSU

Are you looking at my bird?

We speak here of the Avian Vocalizations Center at Michigan State uni, or AVoCet, which boasts no less than 10,200 recordings from over 3,190 species in 45 countries at the last report – "and that's growing quickly," according to Pamela Rasmussen, Michigan State zoology prof.

"Soon recordings and their data from many more species and areas will be available for download," she adds.

Rasmussen is personally responsible for many of the present recordings, having collected bird calls on every continent in her travels. Others have been provided by students and local ornithologists around the world.

According to the prof, bird calls are not the simple matter one might suppose. Some types of bird apparently sing in regional dialects: others have an astonishing repertoire of different sounds. Apparently "a single male Brown Thrasher is known to give 2,000 different notes".

Rasmussen hopes that the AVoCet database will help the ornithology and birdwatching community to increase humanity's knowledge of its feathered chums in a scientific and systematic manner.

"We know that certain species will go extinct in the near future and, sadly, there's not a lot that can realistically be done about it," she says. "However, ornithologists and birders [twitchers or birdwatchers] do now have the opportunity to document virtually all the species of birds out there in one way or another, and one major goal of AVoCet is to contribute to this effort."

You can find out more about AVoCet here. ®

Bootnote

Twitching is evidently not the hobby of the sad, unsuccessful misanthrope of popular lore – if any sad misanthropes are involved they are plainly wealthy and successful ones. A birdwatching tome, John James Audubon's Birds of America, has just set a new world record for most expensive book at £7.3m.

Internet Security Threat Report 2014

More from The Register

next story
I'll be back (and forward): Hollywood's time travel tribulations
Quick, call the Time Cops to sort out this paradox!
Antarctic ice THICKER than first feared – penguin-bot boffins
Robo-sub scans freezing waters, rocks warming models
Your PHONE is slowly KILLING YOU
Doctors find new Digitillnesses - 'text neck' and 'telepressure'
Reuse the Force, Luke: SpaceX's Elon Musk reveals X-WING designs
And a floating carrier for recyclable rockets
Britain's HUMAN DNA-strewing Moon mission rakes in £200k
3 days, and Kickstarter moves lander 37% nearer takeoff
Bond villains lament as Wicked Lasers withdraw death ray
Want to arm that shark? Better get in there quick
prev story

Whitepapers

Designing and building an open ITOA architecture
Learn about a new IT data taxonomy defined by the four data sources of IT visibility: wire, machine, agent, and synthetic data sets.
Why CIOs should rethink endpoint data protection in the age of mobility
Assessing trends in data protection, specifically with respect to mobile devices, BYOD, and remote employees.
Getting started with customer-focused identity management
Learn why identity is a fundamental requirement to digital growth, and how without it there is no way to identify and engage customers in a meaningful way.
High Performance for All
While HPC is not new, it has traditionally been seen as a specialist area – is it now geared up to meet more mainstream requirements?
Security and trust: The backbone of doing business over the internet
Explores the current state of website security and the contributions Symantec is making to help organizations protect critical data and build trust with customers.