Feeds

Salesforce.com parks cloudy database over Ellison's head

Now witness the relational firepower

High performance access to file storage

Dreamforce 2010 Larry Ellison's got a new database competitor in the form of Salesforce.com, with the launch of Database.com from his one-time protégé Marc Benioff.

Salesforce.com is going head-to-head against Oracle, as Benioff plans today to unveil his new venture. It's a relational database in the sky, delivered as a service and sold via subscription rather than software license. Database.com is planned for 2011.

Database.com is Salesforce.com's existing multi-tenant Oracle-based database, used under the covers of Salesforce.com and Force.com, but with a new name, a separate URL and features targeting admins and devs spanning different languages and deploying to fixed, mobile and cloud.

It will be a fully relational service, with features such as field types, triggers and stored procedures, a query language and enterprise search.

Developers will be able to write to Database.com using a set of toolkits, which - when described to us - sound like plug-ins to existing IDEs. Toolkits are planned for Java, .Net, Ruby, PHP, Amazon EC2, Google AppEngine, Google Data, Microsoft's Azure, iOS and Android, Facebook, Twitter, and Adobe's Flash and Flex.

The tools mean, for example, an iPhone app dev could write native iPhone apps in Objective C, with the apps running on the iPhone while connecting to Database.com.

Eric Stahl, senior director of product marketing, told The Reg the toolkits would let you add code to your apps so they can call Database.com. Singling out Apple, Stahl said: "You use the iOS SDK and we give you code that you add to the app and you make a native Objective C calls."

Pricing, meanwhile, is not based on the number of databases you own, but on the number of records and transactions instead.

Database.com will be free for up to three users with 100,000 records and 50,000 transactions per month. It will be priced at $10 per month for each set of 100,000 records beyond that, and $10 per month for each set of 150,000 transactions beyond that.

User identity, authentication and low-level security access controls are added as part of Database.com Enterprise Services priced at $10 per user per month.

Salesforce.com's going to great effort on Database.com. It's bought the URL but is not putting a date on delivery of the service in 2011, until it's refined it.

The unveiling today at Salesforce.com's Dreamforce conference in San Francisco, California, comes after Benioff and Ellison crossed swords over cloud services earlier this year.

Ellison unveiled his latest Exadata server at Oracle's OpenWorld he launched by knocking Salesforce, calling it one of two possible models of cloud computing. See if you can guess who's got the right model and who's got the wrong model in this scenario.

Benioff shot back saying the cloud does not come in a box - the box in question being Ellison's handsomely priced Exadata server. Larry, who likes his hardware, retorted that Salesforce.com uses a multi-tenancy architecture 15 years out of date and has a "horrible" security model.

We asked about the timing for today's unveiling - any connection with the recent clash of handbags? Stahl told us diplomatically: "We are looking to enter new markets."

Is Salesforce.com going after Oracle or MySQL customers? It wouldn't be the first to chase MySQL customers, as the number of MySQL service companies is expanding to take advantage of uncertainty over the database, and lure development and support dollars away from Oracle.

"I wouldn't split by which database product they are using," Stahl said. "I think more in terms of people looking for a faster, cheaper better way to build enterprise applications and who are moving to the cloud."

And it all started so nicely. Ellison was an early investor in Salesforce.com, started by ex-Oracle employee Benioff, putting $2m of his own money into the company. ®

High performance access to file storage

More from The Register

next story
Android engineer: We DIDN'T copy Apple OR follow Samsung's orders
Veep testifies for Samsung during Apple patent trial
Microsoft: Windows version you probably haven't upgraded to yet is ALREADY OBSOLETE
Pre-Update versions of Windows 8.1 will no longer support patches
OpenSSL Heartbleed: Bloody nose for open-source bleeding hearts
Bloke behind the cockup says not enough people are helping crucial crypto project
Half of Twitter's 'active users' are SILENT STALKERS
Nearly 50% have NEVER tweeted a word
Windows XP still has 27 per cent market share on its deathbed
Windows 7 making some gains on XP Death Day
Internet-of-stuff startup dumps NoSQL for ... SQL?
NoSQL taste great at first but lacks proper nutrients, says startup cloud whiz
Microsoft lobs pre-release Windows Phone 8.1 at devs who dare
App makers can load it before anyone else, but if they do they're stuck with it
US taxman blows Win XP deadline, must now spend millions on custom support
Gov't IT likened to 'a Model T with a lot of things on top of it'
prev story

Whitepapers

Mainstay ROI - Does application security pay?
In this whitepaper learn how you and your enterprise might benefit from better software security.
Five 3D headsets to be won!
We were so impressed by the Durovis Dive headset we’ve asked the company to give some away to Reg readers.
3 Big data security analytics techniques
Applying these Big Data security analytics techniques can help you make your business safer by detecting attacks early, before significant damage is done.
The benefits of software based PBX
Why you should break free from your proprietary PBX and how to leverage your existing server hardware.
Mobile application security study
Download this report to see the alarming realities regarding the sheer number of applications vulnerable to attack, as well as the most common and easily addressable vulnerability errors.