Feeds

Google in 'better' copyright protection vow

Music and TV giant kiss-up

Secure remote control for conventional and virtual desktops

As it seeks to make nice with the big name record labels, TV networks, and movie studios, Google has announced that it's working to provide better protection against online copyright infringement. At least in four small ways.

"As the web has grown, we have seen a growing number of issues relating to infringing content. We respond expeditiously to requests to remove such content from our services, and have been improving our procedures over time," Google general counsel Kent Walker said in a blog post. "But as the web grows, and the number of requests grows with it, we are working to develop new ways to better address the underlying problem."

For one, the company says it will improve its DMCA takedown system, reducing its average response time to 24 hours or less – "for copyright owners who use the tools responsibly." But at the same time, Google will improve its tools for those would wish to challenge a DMCA takedown with a counter notice.

The new tools will be applied to Google Search and Blogger first, with other services to follow.

Walker also said that the company will remove terms that are "closely associated with piracy" from its search auto-complete tool, work harder to remove copyright infringing websites from making money off its AdSense advertising program, and experiment with ways to make authorized previews of copyrighted content "more accessible" in its search results. "Most users want to access legitimate content and are interested in sites that make that content available to them (even if only on a preview basis)," Walker says. "We’ll be looking at ways to make this content easier to index and find.

At least one music industry giant is pleased – but only up to a point. "It is encouraging that Google is beginning to respond to our calls to act more responsibly with regard to illegal content," a BPI spokesman said in a statement sent to The Reg. "However, this package of measures, while welcome, still ignores the heart of the problem - that Google search overwhelmingly directs consumers looking for music and other digital entertainment to illegal sites.

“We call on Google to work actively with us to implement a technical solution that points music fans to sites that reward artists and everyone involved in creating music.”

As the owner of YouTube, Google has come under heavy fire from the music, TV, and movie giants for its treatment of copyright, and prior to purchasing the video sharing site in 2006, even Google execs described it as a "rogue enabler of content theft." The next year, Viacom, home to MTV and Comedy Central, filed a $1bn copyright suit against Google and YouTube.

Google won the case earlier this year, and it now licenses some copyrighted content for use on YouTube. But it's hoping to further improve relations with the music, TV, and movie giants. Mountain View is working to license tunes from the labels for its own online music service, and it's negotiating with TV and movie types to stop them from blocking access to online content on its fledging television platform, Google TV. ®

The essential guide to IT transformation

More from The Register

next story
Assange™: Hey world, I'M STILL HERE, ignore that Snowden guy
Press conference: ME ME ME ME ME ME ME (cont'd pg 94)
Premier League wants to PURGE ALL FOOTIE GIFs from social media
Not paying Murdoch? You're gonna get a right LEGALLING - thanks to automated software
Caught red-handed: UK cops, PCSOs, specials behaving badly… on social media
No Mr Fuzz, don't ask a crime victim to be your pal on Facebook
Ballmer quits Microsoft board to spend more time with his b-balls
From Clippy to Clippers: Hi, I see you're running an NBA team now ...
Online tat bazaar eBay coughs to YET ANOTHER outage
Web-based flea market struck dumb by size and scale of fail
Amazon takes swipe at PayPal, Square with card reader for mobes
Etailer plans to undercut rivals with low transaction fee offer
Call of Duty daddy considers launching own movie studio
Activision Blizzard might like quality control of a CoD film
US regulators OK sale of IBM's x86 server biz to Lenovo
Now all that remains is for gov't offices to ban the boxes
prev story

Whitepapers

5 things you didn’t know about cloud backup
IT departments are embracing cloud backup, but there’s a lot you need to know before choosing a service provider. Learn all the critical things you need to know.
Implementing global e-invoicing with guaranteed legal certainty
Explaining the role local tax compliance plays in successful supply chain management and e-business and how leading global brands are addressing this.
Build a business case: developing custom apps
Learn how to maximize the value of custom applications by accelerating and simplifying their development.
Rethinking backup and recovery in the modern data center
Combining intelligence, operational analytics, and automation to enable efficient, data-driven IT organizations using the HP ABR approach.
Next gen security for virtualised datacentres
Legacy security solutions are inefficient due to the architectural differences between physical and virtual environments.