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Microsoft waves arms, signals 2.5m Kinect sales

Sony keeping mum

Internet Security Threat Report 2014

Microsoft has claimed to have sold more than 2.5m Kinect Xbox add-ons since the gadget went on sale earlier this month.

It reckons it'll sell the same volume again before the year is out, most of them in the next 25 days or so, we'd say.

Sony's alternative offering, Move, which requires the player wave a rather phallic controller around, went on sale in September. The Japanese giant has yet to say how many of Moves it has... er... moved globally.

In the US, however, it shifted a million of the things in the first 30 days, with possibly 1.5m in Europe. Together, these totals match the Kinect figure, but required more time to achieve it.

Of course, Sony hasn't yet said how many more Moves it has sold over the last few months, but we'd expect it to be ahead of Microsoft, if only because it has has been on sale for a longer period.

Kinect uses a variety of sensing techniques to track body movement and recognise faces. It has already been hacked to operate with a variety of systems other than the console for which it was intended.

So, a definite success this Crimble, then? Well, one 'psychic' octopus doesn't think so. ®

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