Feeds

SAP ordered to pay Oracle $1.3bn

Drop-your-pants time (again)

The essential guide to IT transformation

In a final act of ritual humiliation, SAP has been ordered to pay Oracle $1.3bn over stolen intellectual property.

A US court has told the world's largest business software company to pay up after Oracle had sought damages for theft of its IP by defunct SAP subsidiary TomorrowNow.

Oracle had been gunning for $1.7bn in damages in closing arguments in the case, while SAP called for an award closer to $40m.

SAP has been on the back foot through the trial. It had already admitted wrongdoing by TomorrowNow. It agreed to pay Oracle $120m in legal fees and its co-CEO was baited into apologizing to Oracle under pressure from Oracle's attorney.

Bloomberg reports that this is the largest jury award of 2010, the largest ever for copyright infringement and the 23rd-largest of all time for any jury award.

About the only thing that went SAP’s way was not having ex-CEO Leo Apoteker dragged onto the stand by Larry Ellison's private dicks and subpoena merchants.

SAP is now holding out the prospect of an appeal. In a statement, SAP is reported to have said: "We are, of course, disappointed by this verdict and will pursue all available options, including post-trial motions and appeal if necessary. This will unfortunately be a prolonged process and we continue to hope that the matter can be resolved appropriately without more years of litigation."

Clinging to its dignity in the face of a triumphant Ellison, SAP added: "The mark of a leading company is the way it handles its mistakes. As stated in court, we regret the actions of TN, we have accepted liability, and have been willing to fairly compensate Oracle."

SAP still doesn’t get it. That's what you get for your co-founder failing to show the proper respect by dropping his pants and mooning Ellison's fleet on the high seas. ®

The essential guide to IT transformation

More from The Register

next story
Apple promises to lift Curse of the Drained iPhone 5 Battery
Have you tried turning it off and...? Never mind, here's a replacement
Mozilla's 'Tiles' ads debut in new Firefox nightlies
You can try turning them off and on again
Linux turns 23 and Linus Torvalds celebrates as only he can
No, not with swearing, but by controlling the release cycle
Scratched PC-dispatch patch patched, hatched in batch rematch
Windows security update fixed after triggering blue screens (and screams) of death
This is how I set about making a fortune with my own startup
Would you leave your well-paid job to chase your dream?
prev story

Whitepapers

Endpoint data privacy in the cloud is easier than you think
Innovations in encryption and storage resolve issues of data privacy and key requirements for companies to look for in a solution.
Implementing global e-invoicing with guaranteed legal certainty
Explaining the role local tax compliance plays in successful supply chain management and e-business and how leading global brands are addressing this.
Advanced data protection for your virtualized environments
Find a natural fit for optimizing protection for the often resource-constrained data protection process found in virtual environments.
Boost IT visibility and business value
How building a great service catalog relieves pressure points and demonstrates the value of IT service management.
Next gen security for virtualised datacentres
Legacy security solutions are inefficient due to the architectural differences between physical and virtual environments.