Feeds

Isilon may stay on Seattle scene

EMC plans to run it as an 'arm's length' division (allegedly)

Maximizing your infrastructure through virtualization

Opinion The gossip around the water coolers of the storage world is that EMC is going to run Isilon like VMware, as a separate business unit.

This is unverified, but my source is quite respectable. The guy who told me heard it from the office cleaner who emptied the waste paper bin of an EMC exec so close to Pat Gelsinger that they use the same office building – you know, the big one in Hopkinton ... so treat this is as an interesting and possibly true rumour. [Disclaimer - this is a joke. We have no relationship with anyone who knows the cleaners at Hopkinton. We don't even know if they have cleaners.]

Isilon's OneFS operating system recently had iSCSI access added to it, providing block access to a hugely scaled-out filer system built of clustered nodes. We are hearing that this will be the basis for EMC's unified storage platform in the future, not the CLARiiON/Celerra combination.

With iSCSI access to Isilon-stored data already here, it will be easy, relatively, to add Fibre Channel over Ethernet (FCoE) access to the data as well, and then to add physical Fibre Channel access on top of that. Hey presto: we have a scale-out unified storage technology. We are hearing things about an ability to grow or shrink storage volumes (LUNs) dynamically as part of this.

What we are also hearing is that an EMC Celerra response to a NetApp storage bid for a VMware/NFS application scenario is not a winning idea: witness NetApp's success in selling into these environments and gaining market share. The EMC perception is that Isilon storage gives NetApp strong competition and that Isilon has been winning lots of business. It gives EMC a strong counter to NetApp bids into VMware/NFS application environments as Isilon clustering is a whole lot stronger than NetApp's ONTAP in cluster mode.

Isilon could remain headquartered in Seattle, a long way west of Hopkinton, and the operation would carry on unmolested. This separation seems an odd idea though. VMware was a server-based operation with no technology sharing in its base operations with EMC's storage heartland.

Isilon is different. Its technology would appear to be directly comparable with a unified CLARiiON/Celerra technology, but with stronger scale-out abilities, and the ideal would seem to be a melding of these two unified storage stacks. It's a puzzlement. ®

The Power of One eBook: Top reasons to choose HP BladeSystem

More from The Register

next story
Sysadmin Day 2014: Quick, there's still time to get the beers in
He walked over the broken glass, killed the thugs... and er... reconnected the cables*
Auntie remains MYSTIFIED by that weekend BBC iPlayer and website outage
Still doing 'forensics' on the caching layer – Beeb digi wonk
SHOCK and AWS: The fall of Amazon's deflationary cloud
Just as Jeff Bezos did to books and CDs, Amazon's rivals are now doing to it
BlackBerry: Toss the server, mate... BES is in the CLOUD now
BlackBerry Enterprise Services takes aim at SMEs - but there's a catch
The triumph of VVOL: Everyone's jumping into bed with VMware
'Bandwagon'? Yes, we're on it and so what, say big dogs
Carbon tax repeal won't see data centre operators cut prices
Rackspace says electricity isn't a major cost, Equinix promises 'no levy'
prev story

Whitepapers

Implementing global e-invoicing with guaranteed legal certainty
Explaining the role local tax compliance plays in successful supply chain management and e-business and how leading global brands are addressing this.
Consolidation: The Foundation for IT Business Transformation
In this whitepaper learn how effective consolidation of IT and business resources can enable multiple, meaningful business benefits.
Application security programs and practises
Follow a few strategies and your organization can gain the full benefits of open source and the cloud without compromising the security of your applications.
How modern custom applications can spur business growth
Learn how to create, deploy and manage custom applications without consuming or expanding the need for scarce, expensive IT resources.
Securing Web Applications Made Simple and Scalable
Learn how automated security testing can provide a simple and scalable way to protect your web applications.