Feeds

Scareware scammers booby-trap worried Koreans

Mean black-hatters poison Korean language search terms for border clash

Build a business case: developing custom apps

Korean language search terms for the cross-border clash between North and South Korea are already been poisoned so that scareware portals appear prominently in results.

The use of black hat search engine optimisation techniques is designed to expose surfers to fake anti-virus scans that warn on non-existent threats in a bid to trick surfers into buying worse than useless software.

Cybercrooks behind the scam often latch onto breaking news events, such as last week's royal engagement announcement, and the latest attack shows much the same tactics are now been applied well outside the English speaking world.

Searches in Korean for search terms related to Tuesday's shelling between North and South Korea are liable to lead to pages that redirect surfers to scareware download packages that pose as either an ActiveX control or a Flash Player update.

The ActiveX control is served up to surfers using IE while the fake Flash update goes to fans of Firefox, as explained in a blog post by Trend Micro here. ®

Next gen security for virtualised datacentres

Whitepapers

Implementing global e-invoicing with guaranteed legal certainty
Explaining the role local tax compliance plays in successful supply chain management and e-business and how leading global brands are addressing this.
Endpoint data privacy in the cloud is easier than you think
Innovations in encryption and storage resolve issues of data privacy and key requirements for companies to look for in a solution.
Scale data protection with your virtual environment
To scale at the rate of virtualization growth, data protection solutions need to adopt new capabilities and simplify current features.
Boost IT visibility and business value
How building a great service catalog relieves pressure points and demonstrates the value of IT service management.
High Performance for All
While HPC is not new, it has traditionally been seen as a specialist area – is it now geared up to meet more mainstream requirements?