Feeds
75%
Viewsonic Viewpad 7

Viewsonic ViewPad 7 Android tablet

Tablet sceptics, prepare to be converted

  • alert
  • submit to reddit

Choosing a cloud hosting partner with confidence

Netbook nemesis?

The microphone is situated on the left-hand side of the bottom edge, well away from the speakers. Audio Skyping with this device – a quick download from the Android store – is beautifully clear, and in quiet surroundings you won't need headphones.

Viewsonic Viewpad 7

The industrial design is impressive, but not quite up to the standards of Mr Ive

When you do need them, the 3.5mm headphone socket is immediately to the right of the mic, although this probably isn't the optimal place for it, as this makes the headphone jack obtrude, where it messes with the otherwise neat folding support of the black case.

To the right of the headphone socket there's a mini USB socket. This will hook the ViewPad up to your computer as a mass storage device, and is also used for charging. Don't charge from your computer, though, because all you might get like this is a half-amp trickle. The mains USB charger that comes with the kit outputs 2A, and should give you a full charge from zero in a couple of hours.

Verdict

I was tablet-sceptic before I met this machine, but the ViewPad 7 definitely works for me. The screen is big enough for serious couch surfing at home, and the jacket-pocket friendly form-factor makes it a useful travelling companion. You won't be writing War and Peace using any of the various virtual keyboards, but there's scope for serious note-taking once you get the hang of it.

Better still, Viewsonic is currently running a promotion to give you £100 back on the £400 you'll lay down for the ViewPad 7, if you have an old netbook kicking around you can trade in. At £300, this 3G-enabled tablet is very tempting indeed, but you'll have to spend your cash-back on a memory card - this tablet only comes with 512MB of Flash on board. ®

More Tablet Reviews...

Samsung
Galaxy Tab
Archos 7
Home Tablet
Apple iPad
3G 32GB
Amazon
Kindle 3

Beginner's guide to SSL certificates

75%
Viewsonic Viewpad 7

Viewsonic ViewPad 7 Android tablet

Pocketable 7in Android tablet with 3G for data and calls.
Price: £400 RRP

More from The Register

next story
Ex-US Navy fighter pilot MIT prof: Drones beat humans - I should know
'Missy' Cummings on UAVs, smartcars and dying from boredom
Don't wait for that big iPad, order a NEXUS 9 instead, industry little bird says
Google said to debut next big slab, Android L ahead of Apple event
Xperia Z3: Crikey, Sony – ANOTHER flagship phondleslab?
The Fourth Amendment... and it IS better
Netscape Navigator - the browser that started it all - turns 20
It was 20 years ago today, Marc Andreeesen taught the band to play
A drone of one's own: Reg buyers' guide for UAV fanciers
Hardware: Check. Software: Huh? Licence: Licence...?
The Apple launch AS IT HAPPENED: Totally SERIOUS coverage, not for haters
Fandroids, Windows Phone fringe-oids – you wouldn't understand
Apple SILENCES Bose, YANKS headphones from stores
The, er, Beats go on after noise-cancelling spat
Here's your chance to buy an ancient, working APPLE ONE
Warning: Likely to cost a lot even for a Mac
prev story

Whitepapers

Forging a new future with identity relationship management
Learn about ForgeRock's next generation IRM platform and how it is designed to empower CEOS's and enterprises to engage with consumers.
Cloud and hybrid-cloud data protection for VMware
Learn how quick and easy it is to configure backups and perform restores for VMware environments.
Three 1TB solid state scorchers up for grabs
Big SSDs can be expensive but think big and think free because you could be the lucky winner of one of three 1TB Samsung SSD 840 EVO drives that we’re giving away worth over £300 apiece.
Reg Reader Research: SaaS based Email and Office Productivity Tools
Read this Reg reader report which provides advice and guidance for SMBs towards the use of SaaS based email and Office productivity tools.
Security for virtualized datacentres
Legacy security solutions are inefficient due to the architectural differences between physical and virtual environments.