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Bish says sorry for right royal Facebook rant

Lays into Wills and Kate, Big Ears and Lady Di

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The Bishop of Willesden has issued a grovelling apology for "deeply offensive" Facebook comments about the forthcoming nuptials of Wills and Kate.

The Rt Rev Pete Broadbent, Bishop of Willesden, went right into one last Wednesday, apparently suffering from an overdose of royal wedding press euphoria which brought out a dark, republican side to the Man of God.

He ranted: "We need a party in Calais for all good republicans who can't stand the nauseating tosh that surrounds this event."

Working up a good head of steam, he continued: "I managed to avoid the last disaster in slow motion between Big Ears and the Porcelain Doll, and I hope to avoid this one too."

He clarified: "I don’t care about the Royals. I’m a Republican. History: more broken marriages and philanderers among these people than not. Count them up, back through the ages. They cost us an arm and a leg.

"Talent isn’t passed on through people’s bloodstock. The hereditary principle is corrupt and sexist. As with most shallow celebrities they will be set up to fail by the gutter press ... I give the marriage seven years."

Good Lord. No sooner had the Daily Mail got wind of the outrage, that Bish Broadbent moved with lightning speed to avoid an appointment with the Tyburn executioner.

According to the Beeb, he offered: "I recognise that the tone of my language and the content of what I said were deeply offensive, and I apologise unreservedly for the hurt caused.

"It was unwise of me to engage in a debate with others on a semi-public internet forum and to express myself in such language. I accept that this was a major error of judgement on my part. I wish Prince William and Kate Middleton a happy and lifelong marriage, and will hold them in my prayers."

Quite right too. Any other shouty republicans who consider the impending joyous royal wedding as "nauseating tosh" are strongly advised to button their lips and push off to France until it's all over. ®

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