Feeds

Why Microsoft is Acorn and Symbian is the new CP/M

Today's phones are just like '80s computers

High performance access to file storage

Opinion Today's glut of mobile platforms is surprisingly reminiscent of their proliferation on desktops during the 1980s: an analogy which might show how things will develop over the next few decades.

Comparing the operating systems running on today's phones with those of yesteryear is curiously easy - it fits too well to be just coincidence. Both markets seem to have space for a similar number of players with different styles, though the comparison bodes badly for Symbian this time around, and even worse for Microsoft.

Android is clearly an apt inheritor of MS-DOS's crown - cobbled together features doomed to endless instability by the requirement to support a disparate range of hardware. Android works great for some, but others discover their shiny new handsets simply won't download applications from the Marketplace or refuse to pick up a 3G signal, though others have no such problems.

Android users are expected to just tolerate this, and deal with it as best they can though peer advice from the technically better equipped. Just as their forebears (or, more likely, their younger selves) got used to the idiosyncrasies of MS-DOS.

DOS, of course, ousted CP/M - the OS which was considered a shoo-in for the desktop platform of choice, regardless of who made the hardware. And it's in the role of CP/M that we find Symbian lurking: technically superior in many ways, but with a management that was unable to change fast enough to keep up with the new kids on the block who jumped in before anyone had noticed there was a gap.

Not that Symbian is the only one who's been pushed aside - with Android taking Microsoft's spot that pushes Redmond's offering elsewhere: roughly into the place where Acorn once stood. Having achieved early success, with the BBC Micro, Acorn created a new platform with huge optimism. That platform, the RISC-based Archimedes, had many nice features but never really caught on.

The success of the BBC Micro wasn't just down to it having a proper keyboard and removable ROMs, but more the way it was integrated into the educational system of the day. Windows Mobile, equally, owed much of its success to its integration with enterprise systems and Microsoft's insistence that Windows Phone 7 is a consumer offering seems likely to take the platform out of the enterprise in the same way that the Archimedes comprehensively failed to break Acorn out of the school gates.

Some companies do make it out of the education system. Apple, who hid there for a while, has managed to put iOS just where the Mac OS used to be, with simplicity of use outweighing all. Early Mac users suffered accusations of brand slavery and overpriced hardware, just as iPhone users do today, and just like today's iPhone users they bore them with the smug confidence of someone who knows their experience to be a better one.

It's probably too late to bring in new players, though that's not stopped Samsung from launching Bada. With its high aspirations and loud promotions it's hard to consider Bada as anything more than MSX - the mid-80's ill-fated attempt to produce a home-computer standard. In its favour MSX did lead to El Reg's favourite advertising jingle, courtesy of a Toshiba TV ad (better if sung): "What about next year when it's out of date? No worries Dad, this is MSX mate!".

SANS - Survey on application security programs

Next page: And what happened?

More from The Register

next story
A black box for your SUITCASE: Now your lost luggage can phone home – quite literally
Breakfast in London, lunch in NYC, and your clothes in Peru
Broadband Secretary of SHEEP sensationally quits Cabinet
Maria Miller finally resigns over expenses row
AT&T threatens to pull out of FCC wireless auctions over purchase limits
Company wants ability to buy more spectrum space in auction
EE dismisses DATA-BURNING glitch with Orange Mail app
Bug quietly slurps PAYG credit - yet EE denies it exists
Like Google, Comcast might roll its own mobile voice network
Says anything's possible if regulators approve merger with Time Warner
Turnbull leaves Australia's broadband blackspots in the dark
New Statement of Expectations to NBN Co offers get-out clauses for blackspot builds
Facebook claims 100 MEEELLION active users in India
Who needs China when you've got the next billion in your sights?
Facebook splats in-app chat, whacks brats into crack yakety-yak app
Jibber-jabbering addicts turfed out just as Zuck warned
prev story

Whitepapers

Designing a defence for mobile apps
In this whitepaper learn the various considerations for defending mobile applications; from the mobile application architecture itself to the myriad testing technologies needed to properly assess mobile applications risk.
3 Big data security analytics techniques
Applying these Big Data security analytics techniques can help you make your business safer by detecting attacks early, before significant damage is done.
Five 3D headsets to be won!
We were so impressed by the Durovis Dive headset we’ve asked the company to give some away to Reg readers.
The benefits of software based PBX
Why you should break free from your proprietary PBX and how to leverage your existing server hardware.
Securing web applications made simple and scalable
In this whitepaper learn how automated security testing can provide a simple and scalable way to protect your web applications.