Internet Explorer 9 preview thinks inside box, outside browser

Getting into the guts of the PC, one web page at a time

Microsoft released a seventh preview build of Internet Explorer 9 yesterday.

It comes just three weeks after the last iteration of the test versions of Redmond's upcoming browser. The software giant normally releases an update every two months.

"Over the last few weeks, we’ve been tuning the JavaScript engine for more of the patterns we’ve found in real world sites," the company's Dean Hachamovitch wrote in a blog post.

"Based on the progress since the last platform preview, we’re releasing an updated platform preview build today so developers can try it out and provide feedback about the changes."

Microsoft's Chakra JavaScript engine, as noted before, comes heavily loaded with HTML5 and hardware acceleration.

The previous preview of IE 9 beta release 6 also caused a bit of a stir, after the Worldwide Web Consortium revealed the results of its first HTML5 conformance tests.

Based on initial tests, it found that the browser that most closely adheres to the latest set of web standards was in fact Microsoft's IE 9.

The latest preview of the company's Chrome-like browser is now trying to integrate a user's browsing habits directly into Microsoft's operating system.

"Enabling users to pin websites to the Windows taskbar means that users can go directly to sites without having to launch the browser and navigate," said Hachamovitch.

"Making the most of your device for web browsing is significant as well. Taking advantage of the whole PC, and using the specialised graphics hardware and the many cores that modern PCs typically include, offers huge performance gains." ®

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