Feeds

Cyber cops crush plod-snapper site following Millbank riot

Offending page now much more popular

Next gen security for virtualised datacentres

The Metropolitan Police have tried to ban an anti-police website in the wake of the student protests against spending cuts last week.

The Met's public order branch, CO11, contacted web host Just Host.com to request the site be removed because it was: "being used to undertake criminal activities".

The host was then contacted by the Met's e-crime unit, which said the blog was providing "guidance" to offenders. As a result Just Host have suspended Fitwatch's hosting account, while dozens of supporters have reposted the blog.

The e-crime unit wrote to JustHost.com, in a letter seen by the Guardian: "We hereby request [you] de-host this website for a minimum period of 12 months. The website is providing explicit advice to offenders following a major demonstration in central London. The demonstration was marred by violence and several subjects have already been arrested, with a major police operation under way to identify and arrest further offenders."

After the protests, Fitwatch posted an article which advised anyone worried about being arrested after the demonstrations to stay calm, not hand themselves in to police and to get rid of clothes they were wearing at the demo. Protestors were also advised to stay away from similar events.

It advised anyone who had already been arrested to contact the legal support team.

The Fitwatch site has long campaigned against what it sees as heavy-handed tactics from the Forward Intelligence Teams - the police photographers who grab snaps of protestors.

Unsurprisingly to everyone but the police the blog has now been re-hosted by almost the whole internet.

There is a Google cache of Fitwatch here.

Or you can read it on Facebook, Urban75, Indy Media, or any of these other blogs. Don't tell the Met though...

There are more links to it on Twitter than even Stephen Fry can muster.

We've spoken to Scotland Yard and emailed Just Hosts and will update this story when we hear back. ®

The essential guide to IT transformation

More from The Register

next story
Munich considers dumping Linux for ... GULP ... Windows!
Give a penguinista a hug, the Outlook's not good for open source's poster child
UK fuzz want PINCODES on ALL mobile phones
Met Police calls for mandatory passwords on all new mobes
e-Borders fiasco: Brits stung for £224m after US IT giant sues UK govt
Defeat to Raytheon branded 'catastrophic result'
EU justice chief blasts Google on 'right to be forgotten'
Don't pretend it's a freedom of speech issue – interim commish
Yes, but what are your plans if a DRAGON attacks?
Local UK gov outs most ridiculous FoI requests...
Detroit losing MILLIONS because it buys CHEAP BATTERIES – report
Man at hardware store was right: name brands DO last longer
Snowden on NSA's MonsterMind TERROR: It may trigger cyberwar
Plus: Syria's internet going down? That was a US cock-up
UK government accused of hiding TRUTH about Universal Credit fiasco
'Reset rating keeps secrets on one-dole-to-rule-them-all plan', say MPs
Caught red-handed: UK cops, PCSOs, specials behaving badly… on social media
No Mr Fuzz, don't ask a crime victim to be your pal on Facebook
prev story

Whitepapers

5 things you didn’t know about cloud backup
IT departments are embracing cloud backup, but there’s a lot you need to know before choosing a service provider. Learn all the critical things you need to know.
Implementing global e-invoicing with guaranteed legal certainty
Explaining the role local tax compliance plays in successful supply chain management and e-business and how leading global brands are addressing this.
Build a business case: developing custom apps
Learn how to maximize the value of custom applications by accelerating and simplifying their development.
Rethinking backup and recovery in the modern data center
Combining intelligence, operational analytics, and automation to enable efficient, data-driven IT organizations using the HP ABR approach.
Next gen security for virtualised datacentres
Legacy security solutions are inefficient due to the architectural differences between physical and virtual environments.