Feeds

SGI gets its HPC mojo back with CPU-GPU hybrids

Sticking it to racks and blades

Next gen security for virtualised datacentres

Each motherboard has room for two 2.5-inch disk drives and uses a PCI-Express extender card to pull two 8-pin power links off a single 1,100 watt power supply that is in the stick to feed one or two GPUs located in the back of the stick. The mobo has a single low-profile PCI-Express 2.0 port and also has room for two 1.8-inch disks up front near this PCI slot. Each motherboard assembly can be linked to a single double-wide GPU or Tilera co-processor or two single-wide units. A stick can have two of these C32-socket motherboard modules, side-by-side, and each blade inside the stick has six muffin fans (three high and two deep) to help move air over the GPUs.

Here's what a stick looks like populated with two double-wide M2070 GPUs from Nvidia. Again, it is tipped on its side:

SGI Prism XL Stick

SGI's Project Mojo ceepie-geepie stick (click to enlarge)

SGI is being as open as it can be with the Mojo sticks, just like Rackable has always been when it comes to x64 processors used in its server platforms (and the original SGI was not until it learned the hard way that you cannot just support one chip in this world). In the initial Prism XL configurations, the x64 portion of the blade will be the Opteron 4100 motherboard, which is the cheapest one on the market that has the right features, although if customers make a fuss SGI could find a low-voltage Xeon alternative.

Nvidia's fanless single-wide M2050 and double-wide M2070 GPU co-processors are supported in the sticks (El Reg told you all about these devices here) as is the above mentioned double-wide 9370 GPU co-processor from AMD. The M2050 and M2070 are rated at 515 teraflops double precision and 1.03 teraflops single precision in terms of raw math power. The double-wide AMD 9370 has 528 gigaflops DP and 2 teraflops SP and is also supported now. Mannel says that in January SGI will support the single-wide AMD 9350, which only has 400 gigaflops DP but you can put four in a stick, which is 1.6 teraflops.

SGI will also support a PCI-Express version of Tilera's Tile64Pro processor, called the Tile Encore, which has a 64-core chip that are great at integer calculations like the kind used in image and signal processing, encryption and decryption, deep packet inspection, and other spooky workloads we can't tell you about or else we have to kill you. (You can get the scoop on Tilera's chips here.) Tilera is working on a 100-core chip for next year and hopes to scale it up to 200 cores within two years.

Obviously, there are other kinds of accelerators, such as FPGA cards, that could also be slotted into Project Mojo sticks.

Back in June, SGI said it was working on two different racks that would eventually get ceepie-geepie sticks: a 19-inch, 42U rack called Destination (converging many different SGI and Rackable racks and simplifying its product line) as well as the special 24-inch racks used with the Altix UV 1000 blade supers. The Destination rack has a 2U enclosure that can hold three sticks side by side, and 21 of these enclosures are slid into the Destination rack thus:

SGI Prism XL Cabinet

SGI's Prism XL cabinets with ceepie-geepie sticks and switches (click to enlarge)

You could put 126 sticks in this three-rack cabinet design, but for some reason SGI is only putting in 125. That gives you 250 double-wide or 500 single-wide GPUs and 125 Opteron 4100s acting as (for all intents and purposes) head nodes for a GPU cluster. The servers are linked with 36-port managed InfiniBand and 48-port unmanaged Gigabit Ethernet switches from Mellanox.

The InfiniBand runs at QDR (40 Gb/sec) speeds and are linked in a full non-blocking fat tree network. Mannel says that the Project Mojo system is designed to extend from one to 36 cabinets by interconnecting their InfiniBand switches, which would put you at around 9.5 petaflops using the AMD 9370 GPUs and around 14.4 petaflops using the AMD 9350 GPUs. With the Nvidia M2050s, those 36 cabinets could get you around 14 petaflops.

A fully loaded Prism XL rack using the Destination enclosure burns somewhere between 50 and 60 kilowatts under load (about half of the peak rating for the sticks) according to Mannel. The modified Altix UV 24-inch rack will hold 80 sticks instead of 63. No word on when this rack option will be available.

SGI is supporting Red Hat's Enterprise Linux 5.5 and CentOS 5.5 for operating systems on the stick servers now, with RHEL 6 coming in January. The CUDA programming environment for Nvidia GPUs and the OpenCL alternative promoted by AMD are obviously supported on the boxes, as are programming tools from Tilera, Allinea, Caps Enterprise, Portland Group, Rogue Wave, and Research Labs.

Altair PBS is used to schedule work on the Mojo accelerators, and system management is done by SGI's own Management Center Premium Edition (which it inherited from its Linux Networx asset buy a few years back). This whole shebang is known as the Accelerator Execution Environment.

SGI is showing off prototypes of the Project Mojo machines at SC10 this week, and will have them generally available in December. The price of a configured three-rack cabinet setup loaded with CPUs, GPUs, memory, disks, and switches will range from $4.5m to $5m, according to Mannel.

This is about 25 per cent less expensive than building a plain vanilla x64 cluster with InfiniBand switches using SGI's Altix supers, and it takes up a lot less space and electricity, too. ®

Secure remote control for conventional and virtual desktops

More from The Register

next story
HP busts out new ProLiant Gen9 servers
Think those are cool? Wait till you get a load of our racks
Shoot-em-up: Sony Online Entertainment hit by 'large scale DDoS attack'
Games disrupted as firm struggles to control network
Community chest: Storage firms need to pay open-source debts
Samba implementation? Time to get some devs on the job
Like condoms, data now comes in big and HUGE sizes
Linux Foundation lights a fire under storage devs with new conference
Silicon Valley jolted by magnitude 6.1 quake – its biggest in 25 years
Did the earth move for you at VMworld – oh, OK. It just did. A lot
Forrester says it's time to give up on physical storage arrays
The physical/virtual storage tipping point may just have arrived
prev story

Whitepapers

5 things you didn’t know about cloud backup
IT departments are embracing cloud backup, but there’s a lot you need to know before choosing a service provider. Learn all the critical things you need to know.
Implementing global e-invoicing with guaranteed legal certainty
Explaining the role local tax compliance plays in successful supply chain management and e-business and how leading global brands are addressing this.
Backing up Big Data
Solving backup challenges and “protect everything from everywhere,” as we move into the era of big data management and the adoption of BYOD.
Consolidation: The Foundation for IT Business Transformation
In this whitepaper learn how effective consolidation of IT and business resources can enable multiple, meaningful business benefits.
High Performance for All
While HPC is not new, it has traditionally been seen as a specialist area – is it now geared up to meet more mainstream requirements?