Feeds

Google: Oracle doctored that 'copied Java code'

'And, by the by, Android wasn't built by Google'

Secure remote control for conventional and virtual desktops

Google has accused Oracle of doctoring the code samples that allegedly prove Mountain View pilfered Oracle's copyrighted Java code in building its Android mobile operating system.

Late last month, as part of its ongoing lawsuit over the use of Java in Android, Oracle waved six pages of Android code at a federal court (see below), claiming they were "directly copied" from copyrighted Oracle code. But, on Wednesday, Google responded with a court filing of its own, and among so many other things, Mountain View said that in submitting the code, Oracle "redacted or deleted...both expressive material and copyright headers." Google called these omissions "significant elements and features."

Oracle Google code comparison

Oracle accuses Google of code lifting (click to enlarge)

In suing Google, Oracle claims both copyright and patent infringement. The six pages of code are meant to buttress the copyright infringement claim. Oracle says Android's class libraries and documentation infringe on its copyrights, and that approximately one-third of Android's API packages are "derivative" of Oracle's copyrighted Java API packages.

In building Android's Dalvik virtual machine, Google used a subset of the Apache Foundation's Project Harmony, an open source project that attempts to duplicate Java SE. When Oracle first waved those six pages of allegedly-copied code, many assumed that they came from Harmony, but according to Apache, this is not the case.

As Groklaw points out, Google's claim that Oracle doctored the code is reminiscent of the infamous SCO v IBM case, when Big Blue told a judge SCO had "edited and rearranged and juxtaposed [two large swathes of code] to give the appearance of similarity when, in fact, no similarity exists".

But even as it claims that Oracle edited the code, Google says that if it did copy Oracle materials, this isn't a problem. Mountain View claims fair use, minimal copying, and independent creation. "The Android Platform...was created independently and without reference to any works protected by the Asserted Copyrights," its filing reads.

Top 5 reasons to deploy VMware with Tegile

More from The Register

next story
New 'Cosmos' browser surfs the net by TXT alone
No data plan? No WiFi? No worries ... except sluggish download speed
iOS 8 release: WebGL now runs everywhere. Hurrah for 3D graphics!
HTML 5's pretty neat ... when your browser supports it
Mathematica hits the Web
Wolfram embraces the cloud, promies private cloud cut of its number-cruncher
Mozilla shutters Labs, tells nobody it's been dead for five months
Staffer's blog reveals all as projects languish on GitHub
'People have forgotten just how late the first iPhone arrived ...'
Plus: 'Google's IDEALISM is an injudicious justification for inappropriate biz practices'
SUSE Linux owner Attachmate gobbled by Micro Focus for $2.3bn
Merger will lead to mainframe and COBOL powerhouse
iOS 8 Healthkit gets a bug SO Apple KILLS it. That's real healthcare!
Not fit for purpose on day of launch, says Cupertino
prev story

Whitepapers

Secure remote control for conventional and virtual desktops
Balancing user privacy and privileged access, in accordance with compliance frameworks and legislation. Evaluating any potential remote control choice.
Intelligent flash storage arrays
Tegile Intelligent Storage Arrays with IntelliFlash helps IT boost storage utilization and effciency while delivering unmatched storage savings and performance.
WIN a very cool portable ZX Spectrum
Win a one-off portable Spectrum built by legendary hardware hacker Ben Heck
High Performance for All
While HPC is not new, it has traditionally been seen as a specialist area – is it now geared up to meet more mainstream requirements?
Beginner's guide to SSL certificates
De-mystify the technology involved and give you the information you need to make the best decision when considering your online security options.