Feeds

Spin-out OS33 uncloaks in puff of cloud, lets tools hang out

Hot cumulus-on-cumulus money shot

Intelligent flash storage arrays

A startup called OS33 has just come out of stealth mode and wants to run your cloudy infrastructure from its cloud-based tools. This is what you might call cloud-on-cloud action.

The company, which is based in the unlikely IT hot-spot of Brooklyn, New York, is a spin-out of a managed service provider called, appropriately enough, External IT. Jacob Kazakevich, who is president and chief technology officer at OS33, was one of the co-founders of External IT, which is based in Dallas, and was in fact the MSP's CTO from 2002 through 2008.

In 2006, External IT was unhappy with the tools available to manage its systems and started creating its own tools. In 2009, the MSP decided it didn't want to be in the software tools business even as it was using the OS33 tools internally and word of mouth had spread of the tools, which have been deployed at five other MSPs even before OS33 was formally launched. Kazakevich says there are cloudy server, storage, and network slices being used by several thousand companies that have their infrastructure hosted at External IT.

The OS33 tools are a collection of programs written in C#, JavaScript, and AJAX that run on Windows servers and Web browsers. The program is not open-source and it does not run on Linux, which means some MSPs won't give it a whirl, but it can nonetheless be used to deploy Windows or Linux server instances running on the XenServer, Hyper-V, or ESX Server hypervisors – as well as applications streamed down from them using Citrix Systems' XenApp or Microsoft's App-V.

The tool can also be used to interface with public clouds such as Microsoft Azure, Amazon EC2, Google Apps, GoGrid or Rackspace Cloud (others will come in subsequent releases) and can also be used to provision users on Sage or Intuit online accounting applications. (Again, interfaces to other SaaS-style programs are in the works.)

The OS33 1.0 tools were only used internally at External IT, but the subsequent releases put out this year were also tested by the five other MSPs, culminating in the OS33 2.4 release being announced now.

The OS33 tool has four parts. The Web-based graphical user interface is used by system administrators to gain full access to the features of the tool but can also be presented in a restricted mode and used as a self-service portal for MSPs to peddle their virtual wares as well as links to other cloudy services. This Web-based GUI can be customised so the MSP's brand appears on it, which is important to some of OS33's customers. (MSPs want to look like the smart guys who made the clever tool, like everyone else in the world.) This Web interface to OS33 is designed to work from Windows or Mac clients.

The Cloud Connector is the back-end of the tool that has interfaces into the hypervisors to provision private cloud slices or to the public clouds to manage these instances. (You have to independently create server images on the public clouds before OS33 can see them and take control of them.) The Cloud Control Panel is what is used to manage the multiple-tenant clouds with virtual server slices inside of the MSP, and the Application Delivery module is what interfaces with XenApp or App-V to stream Windows applications or with Web applications running on the server slices and control user access to them.

OS33 is charging around $2,500 for a starter kit aimed at MSPs or internal data centres. The code runs on OS33's own data centres, which are located in Texas, New Jersey, Connecticut, and California. Each Cloud Control Panel licence on top of that costs $695, the Cloud Connector costs $200, and an administrator account costs $100. The software is available now. ®

Choosing a cloud hosting partner with confidence

More from The Register

next story
The cloud that goes puff: Seagate Central home NAS woes
4TB of home storage is great, until you wake up to a dead device
Azure TITSUP caused by INFINITE LOOP
Fat fingered geo-block kept Aussies in the dark
You think the CLOUD's insecure? It's BETTER than UK.GOV's DATA CENTRES
We don't even know where some of them ARE – Maude
Intel offers ingenious piece of 10TB 3D NAND chippery
The race for next generation flash capacity now on
Want to STUFF Facebook with blatant ADVERTISING? Fine! But you must PAY
Pony up or push off, Zuck tells social marketeers
Oi, Europe! Tell US feds to GTFO of our servers, say Microsoft and pals
By writing a really angry letter about how it's harming our cloud business, ta
SAVE ME, NASA system builder, from my DEAD WORKSTATION
Anal-retentive hardware nerd in paws-on workstation crisis
prev story

Whitepapers

Why and how to choose the right cloud vendor
The benefits of cloud-based storage in your processes. Eliminate onsite, disk-based backup and archiving in favor of cloud-based data protection.
A strategic approach to identity relationship management
ForgeRock commissioned Forrester to evaluate companies’ IAM practices and requirements when it comes to customer-facing scenarios versus employee-facing ones.
High Performance for All
While HPC is not new, it has traditionally been seen as a specialist area – is it now geared up to meet more mainstream requirements?
Protecting against web application threats using SSL
SSL encryption can protect server‐to‐server communications, client devices, cloud resources, and other endpoints in order to help prevent the risk of data loss and losing customer trust.
Top 5 reasons to deploy VMware with Tegile
Data demand and the rise of virtualization is challenging IT teams to deliver storage performance, scalability and capacity that can keep up, while maximizing efficiency.