Feeds

Panasas claims PAS 12 is fastest parallel storage system ever

Rack 'em up

Next gen security for virtualised datacentres

Panasas is claiming that its PAS 12 kit announced today is the fastest parallel storage system you can get.

The privately-owned company sells parallel access file storage arrays into high-performance computing (HPC)-like markets in the energy, government, academic, finance, pharmaceutical, aeronautic and other markets to do such things as simulate surface temperature changes on a Boeing 787 airplane or run molecular dynamics applications.

Boeing 787 Ansys run from Panasa

Boeing 787 airflow simulation run using ANSYS software.

Its parallel access pitch is that the file server is not in the data path but off to one side so data flows are unhindered. Its PanFS file system is object-based and provides a virtualised storage pool with a global namespace and integrated RAID protection down to the object level.

It says it provides a complete offering whereas competitors like HP, IBM, Isilon, Data Direct and SGI, variously OEM software or hardware parts of their offering, such as third-party RAID controllers. It reckons its incorporation of RAID into PanFS reduces cost and complexity and gets rid of performance bottlenecks.

Anyway, the kit; it's an 11-slot, 4U chassis that scales from 40TB to 4PB - a rack can hold ten of these chassis - and aggregate performance from 1.5GB/sec to 150GB/sec. Panasas claims the 150GB/sec number is the industry's highest. Isilon's S-Series delivers up to 45GB/sec in comparison, while DataDirect's SFA10000 does 10GB/sec.

Panasas also says it has the fastest recovery from drive failure because of its parallel rebuild scheme.

The PAS 12 uses either 10GbE or InfiniBand networking and each has a director blade and storage blades. The director blade, with 64-bit multi-core CPUs, manages system activity and runs clustered metadata services. The storage blades enable parallel reads and writes and run caching algorithms.

Adding more chassis with 40TB capacity each is relatively easy, as the system is self-configuring. Customers can scale their systems by buying more blades, chassis or complete racks.

Panasas says the PAS 12 offers a plug-and-play appliance-like design. The cost for one director blade and ten storage blades offering 40TB capacity and an 80GB cache is around $110,000. Varying that to two director blades and nine storage blades results in a price of $120,000. A director blade on its own is around $30,000. ®

The essential guide to IT transformation

More from The Register

next story
The Return of BSOD: Does ANYONE trust Microsoft patches?
Sysadmins, you're either fighting fires or seen as incompetents now
Microsoft: Azure isn't ready for biz-critical apps … yet
Microsoft will move its own IT to the cloud to avoid $200m server bill
US regulators OK sale of IBM's x86 server biz to Lenovo
Now all that remains is for gov't offices to ban the boxes
Oracle reveals 32-core, 10 BEEELLION-transistor SPARC M7
New chip scales to 1024 cores, 8192 threads 64 TB RAM, at speeds over 3.6GHz
VMware vaporises vCHS hybrid cloud service
AnD yEt mOre cRazy cAps to dEal wIth
El Reg's virtualisation desk pulls out the VMworld crystal ball
MARVIN musings and other Gelsinger Gang guessing games
prev story

Whitepapers

Implementing global e-invoicing with guaranteed legal certainty
Explaining the role local tax compliance plays in successful supply chain management and e-business and how leading global brands are addressing this.
7 Elements of Radically Simple OS Migration
Avoid the typical headaches of OS migration during your next project by learning about 7 elements of radically simple OS migration.
BYOD's dark side: Data protection
An endpoint data protection solution that adds value to the user and the organization so it can protect itself from data loss as well as leverage corporate data.
Consolidation: The Foundation for IT Business Transformation
In this whitepaper learn how effective consolidation of IT and business resources can enable multiple, meaningful business benefits.
High Performance for All
While HPC is not new, it has traditionally been seen as a specialist area – is it now geared up to meet more mainstream requirements?