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AVG snaps up DroidSecurity

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AVG, the security firm best known to its freebie security scanner software for consumers, has announced plans to buy mobile security firm DroidSecurity.

The deal, announced Wednesday, is valued at up to $9.4m.

DroidSecurity specialises in providing security software for smartphones, tablets and other devices running Google’s Android operating system. Its flagship free mobile security app, antivirus free, passed the 4.5 million download milestone last month.

The Israeli start-up makes its revenue by selling ads on its free products. It also offers a premium ad-free version.

Demand for its software is driven more by Windows users transplanting their security concerns onto a new platform rather than inherent risks, which are scant give or take the odd SMS Trojan for Android that has appeared in Russia. The technology also offers anti-text message spam filtering capabilities, which may be the main driver in its uptake.

Both firm operate a similar business of offering free consumer security packages to consumers, so there would appear to be a good cultural fit. For AVG the deal represents a smart way to move into mobile security. It's unclear whether or not DroidSecurity's technology will be applied to other platforms, such as Symbian, that have also been the occasional victim of mobile malware attacks in the past.

Upon completion of the deal, DroidSecurity will become a wholly-owned subsidiary of AVG. DroidSecurity chief exec and co-founder, Eran Pfeffer, will become the general manager of AVG’s Mobile Solutions Team (MST), but its operations and research will remain in Israel.

AVG's statement on the deal can be found here. ®

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