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Samsung NF210

Samsung NF210 dual-core netbook

Quirky design, state-of-the-art Atom CPU

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Security for virtualized datacentres

Cosmetics cover standard spec

The trackpad is the same colour but textureless, and that's the only differentiation between the two. Actually, there's no real boundary at all. The only way you know your finger has slipped off the trackpad, without looking, is that the cursor stops moving.

Samsung NF210

The US edition - seen here - applies a different texture to the trackpad. It's missing from the UK NF210

The trackpad's buttons, formed from a single piece of chrome-look plastic, have a notch to separate one from t'other and a pleasingly light action for a netbook.

Outside, you have a standard netbook port array. There's no USB 3.0 here - though the machine does have Bluetooth 3.0 - and the Ethernet is 10/100Mb/s not Gigabit. The memory card slot can take SDXC cards.

The NF210 is Samsung's first netbook with Intel's new Atom N550 dual-core processor for netbooks - Asus' Eee PC 1215N, also a dual-core netbook, uses a desktop CPU. The N550 may have two cores, virtually doubled again with HyperThreading technology, but it runs at 1.5GHz, less than the 1.6GHz of the first Atoms.

Samsung NF210

Protecting users from Firesheep and other Sidejacking attacks with SSL

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