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Nexus One to get Gingerbread OS?

Twittermill chews over rumours

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It seems that the venerable Nexus One might be the first phone to get Gingerbread, if tweets from the Open Handset Alliance are to be believed.

The tweets come from 'Alliance member Alvaro Fuentes Vasquez, who appears to confirm that Gingerbread will be Android version 2.3 and will be available to developers using Nexus One handsets in the next few days.

The Android Police blog, which spotted the tweet, reckons that chimes with earlier rumours and Samsung's announcement scheduled for later today.

That announcement, it seems, will concern the launch of the Nexus Two, to be built by Samsung and (if financial-freebie City AM is to be believed) sold by Carphone Warehouse. The Nexus Two is widely expected to be the first handset to run Gingerbread, but the tweets from Alvaro Fuentes Vasquez warn Nexus One users to be ready for an update:

"Preparen sys Nexus One (Developer version) para la actualización vía OTA de Android 2.3 (Gingerbread) para los próximos días :-D"

...which Android Police helpfully ran though Google Translate to get:

"Prepare your Nexus One (Developer version) for Android OTA update 2.3 (Gingerbread) for the next few days:-D"

That would fit with the screenshots of a Nexus One running Gingerbread that have been knocking around the internet for the last week or so. Such things are easy to fake, but Google has a soft spot for the Nexus One so it's possible that such an update will come, even if the hardware proves underpowered for Gingerbread.

Google's headlong dash to get new versions of Android out doesn't always mean more powerful hardware is needed, as new features or optimisations can do more for existing handsets. Users of those handsets might prefer Google to spend some time fixing existing bugs in retaining cell signals, or enabling the use of web proxies, but that's no fun and the Open Handset Alliance is more interested in features than fixes.

Not that the Open Handset Alliance has much say in the matter: it is supposed to be the governing body for Android development, and Alvaro Fuentes Vasquez is on the Leadership team, but the 'Alliance is little more than a front organisation intended to deflect accusations that Google was trying to take over the (mobile) world. Such accusations never became a problem, though, so the 'Alliance barely gets mentioned these days.

Despite that, it's safe to assume that the Leadership team still gets some attention from Mountain View, so anyone with a Nexus One handy may get the opportunity to be very smug indeed in the next week or so ®.

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