Feeds

Yahoo! invites world of boffins into 4,000-node Hadoop cluster

Hello! Yahoo! is! a! tech! company!

3 Big data security analytics techniques

Yahoo! has opened up its Hadoop research cluster to computer science boffins at four additional US universities, including Stanford, the University of Washington, the University of Michigan, and Purdue.

The company's M45 cluster — a Hadoop setup spanning 4,000 processors and 1.5-petabyte of disk space inside a data center at Yahoo!'s Sunnyvale headquarters —– was originally launched in 2007, and is now available for Big Data research at eight universities across the country. Other participants include founding member Carnegie Mellon, plus the The University of California at Berkeley, Cornell University, and the University of Massachusetts at Amherst.

Speaking with The Reg, Thomas Kwan, director of research operations for Yahoo! Research, reaffirmed the company's commitment to Hadoop research, saying that the M45 continues not only to drive development of the open source distributed number-crunching platform, but to serve as a means of educating future Yahoo! employees.

Though the M45 is a godsend for Big Data boffins, it's a rather large inconvenience for the mainstream media, which insists on telling the world that Yahoo! is not a tech company. It can be difficult to explain why a non-tech company is funding a 4,000-processor and 1.5-petabyte data cluster that crunches epic amounts of data using an open source distributed-computing platform that now underpins everything from Facebook to Twitter to a portion of Microsoft Bing.

Hadoop — whose development was largely driven by Yahoo! — is based on the GFS and MapReduce distributed-computing platforms developed at Google. In 2004, Mountain View published a pair of papers on these technologies, and soon, Doug Cutting — known previously for developing Lucene, the open-source retrieval library — used them to start an open source shadow project. He called it Hadoop after his son's stuffed elephant.

Today, the M45 drives such projects as the Carnegie Mellon natural language–processing system known as NELL (Never Ending Language Learning System) and the University of Washington's sweeping knowledge database project KnowItAll. The cluster is only available to universities. ®

SANS - Survey on application security programs

More from The Register

next story
This time it's 'Personal': new Office 365 sub covers just two devices
Redmond also brings Office into Google's back yard
Kingston DataTraveler MicroDuo: Turn your phone into a 72GB beast
USB-usiness in the front, micro-USB party in the back
Dropbox defends fantastically badly timed Condoleezza Rice appointment
'Nothing is going to change with Dr. Rice's appointment,' file sharer promises
BOFH: Oh DO tell us what you think. *CLICK*
$%%&amp Oh dear, we've been cut *CLICK* Well hello *CLICK* You're breaking up...
Just what could be inside Dropbox's new 'Home For Life'?
Biz apps, messaging, photos, email, more storage – sorry, did you think there would be cake?
IT bods: How long does it take YOU to train up on new tech?
I'll leave my arrays to do the hard work, if you don't mind
Amazon reveals its Google-killing 'R3' server instances
A mega-memory instance that never forgets
prev story

Whitepapers

Designing a defence for mobile apps
In this whitepaper learn the various considerations for defending mobile applications; from the mobile application architecture itself to the myriad testing technologies needed to properly assess mobile applications risk.
3 Big data security analytics techniques
Applying these Big Data security analytics techniques can help you make your business safer by detecting attacks early, before significant damage is done.
Five 3D headsets to be won!
We were so impressed by the Durovis Dive headset we’ve asked the company to give some away to Reg readers.
The benefits of software based PBX
Why you should break free from your proprietary PBX and how to leverage your existing server hardware.
Securing web applications made simple and scalable
In this whitepaper learn how automated security testing can provide a simple and scalable way to protect your web applications.