Feeds

Yahoo! invites world of boffins into 4,000-node Hadoop cluster

Hello! Yahoo! is! a! tech! company!

Internet Security Threat Report 2014

Yahoo! has opened up its Hadoop research cluster to computer science boffins at four additional US universities, including Stanford, the University of Washington, the University of Michigan, and Purdue.

The company's M45 cluster — a Hadoop setup spanning 4,000 processors and 1.5-petabyte of disk space inside a data center at Yahoo!'s Sunnyvale headquarters —– was originally launched in 2007, and is now available for Big Data research at eight universities across the country. Other participants include founding member Carnegie Mellon, plus the The University of California at Berkeley, Cornell University, and the University of Massachusetts at Amherst.

Speaking with The Reg, Thomas Kwan, director of research operations for Yahoo! Research, reaffirmed the company's commitment to Hadoop research, saying that the M45 continues not only to drive development of the open source distributed number-crunching platform, but to serve as a means of educating future Yahoo! employees.

Though the M45 is a godsend for Big Data boffins, it's a rather large inconvenience for the mainstream media, which insists on telling the world that Yahoo! is not a tech company. It can be difficult to explain why a non-tech company is funding a 4,000-processor and 1.5-petabyte data cluster that crunches epic amounts of data using an open source distributed-computing platform that now underpins everything from Facebook to Twitter to a portion of Microsoft Bing.

Hadoop — whose development was largely driven by Yahoo! — is based on the GFS and MapReduce distributed-computing platforms developed at Google. In 2004, Mountain View published a pair of papers on these technologies, and soon, Doug Cutting — known previously for developing Lucene, the open-source retrieval library — used them to start an open source shadow project. He called it Hadoop after his son's stuffed elephant.

Today, the M45 drives such projects as the Carnegie Mellon natural language–processing system known as NELL (Never Ending Language Learning System) and the University of Washington's sweeping knowledge database project KnowItAll. The cluster is only available to universities. ®

Remote control for virtualized desktops

More from The Register

next story
The cloud that goes puff: Seagate Central home NAS woes
4TB of home storage is great, until you wake up to a dead device
Azure TITSUP caused by INFINITE LOOP
Fat fingered geo-block kept Aussies in the dark
You think the CLOUD's insecure? It's BETTER than UK.GOV's DATA CENTRES
We don't even know where some of them ARE – Maude
Want to STUFF Facebook with blatant ADVERTISING? Fine! But you must PAY
Pony up or push off, Zuck tells social marketeers
Yahoo! blames! MONSTER! email! OUTAGE! on! CUT! CABLE! bungle!
Weekend woe for BT as telco struggles to restore service
Oi, Europe! Tell US feds to GTFO of our servers, say Microsoft and pals
By writing a really angry letter about how it's harming our cloud business, ta
prev story

Whitepapers

Choosing cloud Backup services
Demystify how you can address your data protection needs in your small- to medium-sized business and select the best online backup service to meet your needs.
Getting started with customer-focused identity management
Learn why identity is a fundamental requirement to digital growth, and how without it there is no way to identify and engage customers in a meaningful way.
Reg Reader Research: SaaS based Email and Office Productivity Tools
Read this Reg reader report which provides advice and guidance for SMBs towards the use of SaaS based email and Office productivity tools.
Choosing a cloud hosting partner with confidence
Download Choosing a Cloud Hosting Provider with Confidence to learn more about cloud computing - the new opportunities and new security challenges.
Intelligent flash storage arrays
Tegile Intelligent Storage Arrays with IntelliFlash helps IT boost storage utilization and effciency while delivering unmatched storage savings and performance.