Feeds

PayPal rushes out patched iPhone app

Old one didn't detect spoof sites

Build a business case: developing custom apps

PayPal has submitted an updated iPhone application after learning that the previous one failed to check the digital certificates that confirmed the authenticity of the online-payment website.

The hole leaves iPhone users who rely on the app open to man-in-the-middle attacks when connecting over unsecured networks such as Wi-Fi hotspots. PayPal learned of the flaw on Tuesday, when a Wall Street Journal reporter asked for comment. A day later, the company rushed out a patched version to Apple's app store.

“We submitted a revised application to Apple within 24 hours of being notified,” Anuj Nayar, spokesman for the eBay-owned division, told The Register. “We don't believe that any customers have been affected. Even if they had been, it's very clear that our protection policy would cover them 100 percent.”

It's not clear how long the defective iPhone app was in circulation. An app for Android-based phones wasn't affected.

It was only last week that PayPal plugged cross-site scripting hole on its mobile payments site that had the potential for misuse in phishing attacks. ®

Next gen security for virtualised datacentres

Whitepapers

Implementing global e-invoicing with guaranteed legal certainty
Explaining the role local tax compliance plays in successful supply chain management and e-business and how leading global brands are addressing this.
Endpoint data privacy in the cloud is easier than you think
Innovations in encryption and storage resolve issues of data privacy and key requirements for companies to look for in a solution.
Scale data protection with your virtual environment
To scale at the rate of virtualization growth, data protection solutions need to adopt new capabilities and simplify current features.
Boost IT visibility and business value
How building a great service catalog relieves pressure points and demonstrates the value of IT service management.
High Performance for All
While HPC is not new, it has traditionally been seen as a specialist area – is it now geared up to meet more mainstream requirements?