Feeds

Undead Bredolab zombie network lashes out from the grave

Someone's still pulling the strings

Build a business case: developing custom apps

The decapitation of command and control servers associated with the infamous Bredolab botnet, and the arrest of a suspect in Armenia, is a fantastic step forward for internet hygiene. But these steps have nevertheless failed to stop all malicious activity associated with the zombie network.

An operation led by the Dutch police led to the takedown of 143 command and control servers associated with the information-stealing botnet, estimated to have infected 30 million computers worldwide. Dutch net firm Fox-IT used the botnet itself to inform infected victims that their PCs had been pwned, sending them to a notice here.

Despite all this, at least two botnet command nodes remain active. The remaining infected nodes that dial into these nodes in Kazakhstan and Russia will be interacted to download a fake anti-virus package called Antivirusplus and distribute spam, respectively. Both domains remain active at the time of writing, although a third command and control node in Russia, which flickered alive earlier this week, appears to have gone inactive.

A detailed blog post by net security firm FireEye concludes that a portion of the Bredolab botnet remains active. It reckons a second group of bot herders are issuing new instructions through various domains to the remaining population of zombie drones in the Bredolab botnet. These cybercrooks are either using leaked copies of Bredolab code to build and maintain their own botnet or they are continuing to use portions of Bredolab that they had previously rented from the primary hacker.

Dutch police told PC World that their investigation into Bredolab remains ongoing, adding that its takedown operation is not yet over. ®

The essential guide to IT transformation

More from The Register

next story
Rupert Murdoch says Google is worse than the NSA
Mr Burns vs. The Chocolate Factory, round three!
e-Borders fiasco: Brits stung for £224m after US IT giant sues UK govt
Defeat to Raytheon branded 'catastrophic result'
Germany 'accidentally' snooped on John Kerry and Hillary Clinton
Dragnet surveillance picks up EVERYTHING, USA, m'kay?
Snowden on NSA's MonsterMind TERROR: It may trigger cyberwar
Plus: Syria's internet going down? That was a US cock-up
Who needs hackers? 'Password1' opens a third of all biz doors
GPU-powered pen test yields more bad news about defences and passwords
Think crypto hides you from spooks on Facebook? THINK AGAIN
Traffic fingerprints reveal all, say boffins
Microsoft cries UNINSTALL in the wake of Blue Screens of Death™
Cache crash causes contained choloric calamity
prev story

Whitepapers

Endpoint data privacy in the cloud is easier than you think
Innovations in encryption and storage resolve issues of data privacy and key requirements for companies to look for in a solution.
Implementing global e-invoicing with guaranteed legal certainty
Explaining the role local tax compliance plays in successful supply chain management and e-business and how leading global brands are addressing this.
Top 8 considerations to enable and simplify mobility
In this whitepaper learn how to successfully add mobile capabilities simply and cost effectively.
Solving today's distributed Big Data backup challenges
Enable IT efficiency and allow a firm to access and reuse corporate information for competitive advantage, ultimately changing business outcomes.
Reg Reader Research: SaaS based Email and Office Productivity Tools
Read this Reg reader report which provides advice and guidance for SMBs towards the use of SaaS based email and Office productivity tools.