Feeds

Privacy researchers plot RIM's route

BlackBerry users asked to play 'hunt the servers'

Intelligent flash storage arrays

The Citizen Lab, a Canadian privacy group run from the University of Toronto, is asking BlackBerry users to drop by and let them know how you got there.

It‘s as easy as it sounds, and is explained here by IT Business Canada. Just drop by the website on your Blackberry device and fill in some information about where you are physically located and who provides your connectivity. The Lab will then work out by which route your connection has arrived - eventually creating a worldwide map of RIM's servers, so we can all see under whose authority they fall.

That‘s become more important recently as various governments, notably India and Saudi Arabia, have petitioned RIM to locate servers within their borders, and thus under the authority of their law enforcement. RIM's servers route internet connections including web browsing, as well as hosting non-corporate email services, but won‘t help with lawful intercept of enterprise email, which remains impractical.

But that obviously doesn‘t matter to many governments who have threatened bans on all BlackBerry services, then rescinded those threats in response to unspecified capitulation on the part of RIM. RIM has repeatedly stated that it doesn‘t make special arrangements for specific governments, but locating a server within a country is something that can be done for all sorts of reasons besides security.

Given that RIM won‘t say where the servers are, and that the governments aren't saying either, it‘s down to a group like Citizen Lab to try to work it out.

So if you‘ve got a BlackBerry then head on over and we‘ll see where the servers have ended up - unless you are one of those who would prefer us not to know. ®

Security for virtualized datacentres

More from The Register

next story
TEEN RAMPAGE: Kids in iPhone 6 'Will it bend' YouTube 'prank'
iPhones bent in Norwich? As if the place wasn't weird enough
Consumers agree to give up first-born child for free Wi-Fi – survey
This Herod network's ace – but crap reception in bullrushes
Crouching tiger, FAST ASLEEP dragon: Smugglers can't shift iPhone 6s
China's grey market reports 'sluggish' sales of Apple mobe
Sea-Me-We 5 construction starts
New sub cable to go live 2016
EE coughs to BROKEN data usage metrics BLUNDER that short-changes customers
Carrier apologises for 'inflated' measurements cockup
Comcast: Help, help, FCC. Netflix and pals are EXTORTIONISTS
The others guys are being mean so therefore ... monopoly all good, yeah?
Surprise: if you work from home you need the Internet
Buffer-rage sends Aussies out to experience road rage
EE buys 58 Phones 4u stores for £2.5m after picking over carcass
Operator says it will safeguard 359 jobs, plans lick of paint
prev story

Whitepapers

A strategic approach to identity relationship management
ForgeRock commissioned Forrester to evaluate companies’ IAM practices and requirements when it comes to customer-facing scenarios versus employee-facing ones.
Storage capacity and performance optimization at Mizuno USA
Mizuno USA turn to Tegile storage technology to solve both their SAN and backup issues.
High Performance for All
While HPC is not new, it has traditionally been seen as a specialist area – is it now geared up to meet more mainstream requirements?
Beginner's guide to SSL certificates
De-mystify the technology involved and give you the information you need to make the best decision when considering your online security options.
Security for virtualized datacentres
Legacy security solutions are inefficient due to the architectural differences between physical and virtual environments.