Feeds

Symbian angst downgrades Nokia

Ratings agency gives Finnish mobile maker thumbs down on 'outlook'

3 Big data security analytics techniques

The new management of Nokia is already ringing the changes - identifying several areas widely criticised by outsiders. But the short-term outlook continues to look uncertain. This week rating agency Moody changed its outlook from "stable" to "negative", citing concern about Symbian^3 devices.

Nokia's smartphones may "turn out to be insufficient to reverse Nokia's loss of market share in mobile phones and converged devices and thus to return group operating margins to above 10 percent, one of Moody's rating criteria," the company said.

Last week Nokia tore up its Symbian roadmap, announced a shift from milestone-based Symbian releases, and said it would issue continuous incremental improvements. The move was broadly welcomed by analysts and developers. Nokia also said it will shakeup its lacklustre Ovi services strategy, bringing work back in-house.

The competitiveness problem highlighted by Moody isn't helped by continuing delays to its Linux platform, Nokia's long-term successor to Symbian at the high-margin high-end. Last year, NokiaWorld attendees believed that consumer devices would now be reaching the market. But this has been held-up by a decision to merge with Intel's Linux OS. For Intel, putting Linux into cars and set-top boxes is a side project - for Nokia, it's now life or death.

Moody's debt rating hasn't changed; unlike Apple or IBM during their dark days, Nokia still makes a tidy profit, and has enough cash reserves for one more Navteq-sized acquisition gamble. But it is up against what is now the world's second-largest company, Apple, which has $50bn of cash in the bank - enough to buy Sony... or Nokia. ®

Top three mobile application threats

More from The Register

next story
Virgin Media so, so SORRY for turning spam fire-hose on its punters
Hundreds of emails flood inboxes thanks to gaffe
A black box for your SUITCASE: Now your lost luggage can phone home – quite literally
Breakfast in London, lunch in NYC, and your clothes in Peru
AT&T threatens to pull out of FCC wireless auctions over purchase limits
Company wants ability to buy more spectrum space in auction
Turnbull leaves Australia's broadband blackspots in the dark
New Statement of Expectations to NBN Co offers get-out clauses for blackspot builds
Facebook claims 100 MEEELLION active users in India
Who needs China when you've got the next billion in your sights?
Facebook splats in-app chat, whacks brats into crack yakety-yak app
Jibber-jabbering addicts turfed out just as Zuck warned
Google looks to LTE and Wi-Fi to help it lube YouTube tubes
Bandwidth hogger needs tube embiggenment if it's to succeed
prev story

Whitepapers

SANS - Survey on application security programs
In this whitepaper learn about the state of application security programs and practices of 488 surveyed respondents, and discover how mature and effective these programs are.
Combat fraud and increase customer satisfaction
Based on their experience using HP ArcSight Enterprise Security Manager for IT security operations, Finansbank moved to HP ArcSight ESM for fraud management.
The benefits of software based PBX
Why you should break free from your proprietary PBX and how to leverage your existing server hardware.
Top three mobile application threats
Learn about three of the top mobile application security threats facing businesses today and recommendations on how to mitigate the risk.
3 Big data security analytics techniques
Applying these Big Data security analytics techniques can help you make your business safer by detecting attacks early, before significant damage is done.