Feeds
70%
Samsung Omnia 7

Samsung Omnia 7

Big display for Redmond's redial

  • alert
  • submit to reddit

The Power of One Infographic

Review Samsung's Omnia 7 is one of a handful of Windows Phone 7 devices that have gone on sale this month, and is certainly one of the largest owing to its impressive 4in touchscreen. Yet, there's something about the 1980s to the look of this phone.

Samsung Omnia 7

Quite a handful: Samsung's Omnia 7

Maybe it’s the bevelled edges with their sharp drop off, or the very squared corners. Still, the bevelling makes the handset feel a lot smaller than its 62.4mm width would imply. The back is more gently curved, again making the handset feel less bulky, which is to be applauded given that it's a very large handset, even for the smartphone world.

Most of the specifications are laid down by Microsoft and – rather than go over them again in this review – they are covered in detail in my recent Windows Phone 7 OS appraisal here. Using the Omnia 7, this feature covers most of the handset's smartphone functions. Part of the spec is a screen resolution of 800 x 480, supporting capacitive touch for up to four fingers. Indeed, there’s not much innovation permitted, as all the buttons, controls and interfacing is laid down by Redmond. Suffice to say that Windows Phone 7 on the Omnia chugs along nicely.

The centre, Start, key is physical on the Samsung, but the Back and Search buttons (also on the front of the phone) are touch panels which respond smoothly. Side-mounted buttons manage volume, power and the camera – just as on all the other Window Phone 7 handsets. On top there's a standard microphone socket, and a small sliding door covering the micro USB socket used for charging and connecting to a PC.

Samsung Omnia 7

Robust and responsive

The back is part metal and part plastic – not the cheap wrapping that blights the back of the Galaxy S – being a rather more robust plastic that feels a lot more solid in the hand. A clip slides back to release the battery cover and Sim slot, though no removable storage – apparently Microsoft doesn't approve of such things.

Top three mobile application threats

Next page: Wireless invention

More from The Register

next story
NEW Raspberry Pi B+, NOW with - count them - FOUR USB ports
Composite vid socket binned as GPIO sprouts new pins
Child diagnosed as allergic to iPad
Apple's fondleslab is the tablet dermatitis sufferers won't want to take
Microsoft takes on Chromebook with low-cost Windows laptops
Redmond's chief salesman: We're taking 'hard' decisions
For Lenovo US, 8-inch Windows tablets are DEAD – long live 8-inch Windows tablets
Reports it's killing off smaller slabs are greatly exaggerated
Seventh-gen SPARC silicon will accelerate Oracle databases
Uncle Larry's mutually-optimised stack to become clearer in August
EU dons gloves, pokes Google's deals with Android mobe makers
El Reg cops a squint at investigatory letters
prev story

Whitepapers

Top three mobile application threats
Prevent sensitive data leakage over insecure channels or stolen mobile devices.
The Essential Guide to IT Transformation
ServiceNow discusses three IT transformations that can help CIO's automate IT services to transform IT and the enterprise.
Mobile application security vulnerability report
The alarming realities regarding the sheer number of applications vulnerable to attack, and the most common and easily addressable vulnerability errors.
How modern custom applications can spur business growth
Learn how to create, deploy and manage custom applications without consuming or expanding the need for scarce, expensive IT resources.
Consolidation: the foundation for IT and business transformation
In this whitepaper learn how effective consolidation of IT and business resources can enable multiple, meaningful business benefits.