Feeds

iPhoto 11 ate my library, say users

Upgrade glitch worries prompt fanboi rush to backup and rebuild

Intelligent flash storage arrays

Apple fans upgrading to the latest version of iPhoto are finding that their photos are being gobbled up and spat out to god knows where.

Users have reported albums being reordered, messed up, and in some instances apparently eaten up, either in part or completely.

Unhappy snappers have taken to the vendor's support forums to look for answers, leaving some threads groaning under the pressure.

Mach0u said: "I'm having a ton of problems with iphoto 11 - I strongly urge not to make the upgrade...I've restarted, checked permissions etc...and still not working. Feels very very BETA..."

Chester444 said: "I concluded that when iPhoto was upgrading my library it dwindled down the iPhoto library from 112GB to 14Gb. I am pretty sure it deleted my iPhoto library. Luckily I had a time machine backup. I hope you do too!"

The problem here seems to be that Time Machine would not have grabbed libraries if users left iPhoto open more or less permanently.

The issue has left fans divided, with some pointing out the raft of improvements with the software, while others complain of "too many bugs and poor changes".

Cult of Mac makes the suggestion that wannabe upgraders take the drastic step of backing up their iPhoto library before making the switch. This would of course mean a mindset swap amongst some fanbois to accept the idea that something could potentially go wrong.

Those who've already been scuppered by the process are advised to try to rebuild their permissions, delete the iPhoto preferences file and rebuild their library.

We called Apple to see what its official solution to the users' problem is. We were told: "We don't comment on rumours or speculation." ®

Choosing a cloud hosting partner with confidence

More from The Register

next story
Preview redux: Microsoft ships new Windows 10 build with 7,000 changes
Latest bleeding-edge bits borrow Action Center from Windows Phone
Google opens Inbox – email for people too thick to handle email
Print this article out and give it to someone tech-y if you get stuck
Microsoft promises Windows 10 will mean two-factor auth for all
Sneak peek at security features Redmond's baking into new OS
UNIX greybeards threaten Debian fork over systemd plan
'Veteran Unix Admins' fear desktop emphasis is betraying open source
Google+ goes TITSUP. But WHO knew? How long? Anyone ... Hello ...
Wobbly Gmail, Contacts, Calendar on the other hand ...
DEATH by PowerPoint: Microsoft warns of 0-day attack hidden in slides
Might put out patch in update, might chuck it out sooner
Redmond top man Satya Nadella: 'Microsoft LOVES Linux'
Open-source 'love' fairly runneth over at cloud event
prev story

Whitepapers

Cloud and hybrid-cloud data protection for VMware
Learn how quick and easy it is to configure backups and perform restores for VMware environments.
A strategic approach to identity relationship management
ForgeRock commissioned Forrester to evaluate companies’ IAM practices and requirements when it comes to customer-facing scenarios versus employee-facing ones.
High Performance for All
While HPC is not new, it has traditionally been seen as a specialist area – is it now geared up to meet more mainstream requirements?
Three 1TB solid state scorchers up for grabs
Big SSDs can be expensive but think big and think free because you could be the lucky winner of one of three 1TB Samsung SSD 840 EVO drives that we’re giving away worth over £300 apiece.
Security for virtualized datacentres
Legacy security solutions are inefficient due to the architectural differences between physical and virtual environments.