Feeds

Apple bolts chastity belt on super svelte MacBook Air

But let's go in anyway

Security for virtualized datacentres

Photos Apple doesn't want you mucking about inside its new 11.6-inch MacBook Air. But once you get past its defences, you'll find that its SSD-on-a-card storage system is a snap to remove.

Those are two of the conclusions reached by the parts and repair folks — and teardown fanatics — at iFixit, who bagged one of the svelte ultra-portable notebooks and promptly vivisected it.

Apple MacBook Air model comparison (11.6-inch model)

Compared with the older 13.3-inch Air, the new 11.6-incher looks as if a Chinese cook could use it to prep stir-fry

"Apple apparently doesn't want you inside this thing," iFixit explains. "They decided to use 5-point Security Torx [below, right] to attach the lower case." Fortunately, if you don't have the right size Security Torx driver in your toolkit — or any Security Torx drivers, for that matter, you can cheat and use a small or filed-down flathead screwdriver.

Apple MacBook Air oddball screwhead (11.6-inch model)

Apple's way of saying 'keep out'

Once those $#@!ing oddball screwheads have been successfuly negotiated, lifting off the lower case is a simple matter.

Once inside, iFixit discovered six lithium-polymer cells that add up to the Air's 35 watt-hour power source — a different arrangement than that in the photo that Steve Jobs displayed of the inside of the 13.3-inch version at the ultralight's unveiling Wednesday, which show four larger battery cells. We had guessed that three of the larger cells would be found in the 11.6-incher; we were wrong.

Apple MacBook Air innards (11.6-inch model)

On that wee logic board above the bank o'batteries resides the entire Mac experience

iFixit discovered that removing the Air's storage module was an easy task. That's the good news. The bad news is that according to iFixit, "The drive is a completely custom part, and will probably only be available through Apple support services, thereby putting another nail in the coffin for user-serviceability."

"It's attached to the logic board with what appears to be a new mini-SATA (mSATA) connector, which brings hope to super-slim-laptop-hackers all across the globe," says iFixit's Miro Djuric. "This may enable some crafty tinkerers to rig a larger drive inside the Air, provided they can fit everything within the tight confines of the .68" thick case."

Apple MacBook Air SSD (11.6-inch model)

The SSD is easy to remove — too bad there are no readily available upgrade parts. (Yet?)

As with both new Airs, the 11.6-inch Air has an Nvidia GeForce 320M GPU, and is "powered" — and we use quotes out sheer sarcasm, seeing as how the chip is aging and low-clocked — by an Intel Core 2 Duo running at 1.4GHz.

Snarkiness aside, though, that CPU was most likely necessary due to the tight thermal constraints of the Air's case and power supply. Sure, a better-performing chip would have been nice, but at least the CPU is paired with the Nvidia 320M, which will undoubtedly outperform the integrated graphics of the newer Intel parts.

Ars Technica, by the way, has an Airy GPU/CPU exegesis that's well worth checking out.

Apple MacBook Air CPU AND GPU (11.6-inch model)

The CPU/GPU heatsink snuggles up to each chip in blankets of thermal paste

With all its guts splayed out on an iFixit workbench, it's clear how much internal real estate Apple has devoted to the battery cells inside the 11.6-inch MacBook Air. And how far we've come in the 21 years since the 15.8-pound (7.2 kg) Mac Portable was released.

Apple MacBook Air exploded view (11.6-inch model)

Slick engineering, but the Air's proprietary parts prompt iFixit to score it a mere 4 out 10 for serviceability

To indulge yourself in more naked logic-boardnography and other visuals and analysis, check out iFixit's entire 40-photo teardown. ®

Protecting users from Firesheep and other Sidejacking attacks with SSL

More from The Register

next story
Oi, Tim Cook. Apple Watch. I DARE you to tell me, IN PERSON, that it's secure
State attorney demands Apple CEO bows the knee to him
Phones 4u website DIES as wounded mobe retailer struggles to stay above water
Founder blames 'ruthless network partners' for implosion
Monitors monitor's monitoring finds touch screens have 0.4% market share
Not four. Point four. Count yer booty again, Microsoft
Hey, Mac fanbois. HGST wants you drooling over its HUGE desktop RACK
What vast digital media repository could possibly need 64 TERABYTES?
In a spin: Samsung accuses LG exec of washing machine SABOTAGE
Rival electronic giant tries to iron out allegations
Bono: Apple will sort out monetising music where the labels failed
Remastered so hard it would be difficult or impossible to master it again
prev story

Whitepapers

Secure remote control for conventional and virtual desktops
Balancing user privacy and privileged access, in accordance with compliance frameworks and legislation. Evaluating any potential remote control choice.
WIN a very cool portable ZX Spectrum
Win a one-off portable Spectrum built by legendary hardware hacker Ben Heck
Storage capacity and performance optimization at Mizuno USA
Mizuno USA turn to Tegile storage technology to solve both their SAN and backup issues.
High Performance for All
While HPC is not new, it has traditionally been seen as a specialist area – is it now geared up to meet more mainstream requirements?
The next step in data security
With recent increased privacy concerns and computers becoming more powerful, the chance of hackers being able to crack smaller-sized RSA keys increases.